Dee Cottage

The following photographs are of Dee Cottage, built in 1880, in the industrial suburb of Melbourne called Yarraville. It is considered of historical and architectural significance.

Dee Cottage

On their website, the Heritage Council Victoria, state:

Statement of Significance

Dee cottage is of historical and architectural significance to the City of Maribyrnong as a relatively intact early residence, used as a company house by the nearby Cuming Smith & Co. works and built in association with major industrial development and closely related historically to the local industries which gave it its purpose. (Criteria B2 & D2) Distinctive architectural form of the period also relatively intact and well preserved. (Criterion F1) The site has significant historical associations as a former residence of James Cuming, founder and principal of Cuming Smith fertiliser works and one of Footscray’s most prominent citizens. (Criterion H1)

Australian Heritage Commission (AHC) criteria

The Australian Heritage Commission criteria consist of a set of eight criteria which cover social, aesthetic, scientific, and historic values. Each criterion has sub-criteria written specifically for cultural or natural values. The relevant criteria are:

B.2 rarity

D.2 good example of type

H.1 association with important person or group

F.1 design or technological achievement

Here is the link: http://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/places/28788

Dee Cottage

Dee Cottage

These photos were shot with my Nikon EM film camera using Kodak colour film.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

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Stalingrad – 2005

The following photo was taken in 2005 on a visit to Paris in France. It was taken about a year before I bought a digital SLR. I used my Nikon EM film camera loaded with Kodacolour.

Stalingrad Station

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Harbour Board Building

The Harbour Board Building is a Heritage Listed building in Quay Street, Rockhampton. Also known as the Fitzroy Shire Council Chambers, it was built in 1898 by Renshaw and Ricketts.

Quay Street, Rockhampton, is well known for its Heritage Buildings.

 

IMG_0851.jpg

The Heritage listed Harbour Board Building 

 

The above photo was taken using my iPhone.

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Road Trip – Days 1 – 3

Our road trip was planned. My wife and I hired a motor-home and we were going to use it to drive to Yeppoon on the central Queensland coast; a return journey of over four thousand kilometres with four weeks to complete our journey.

Like most plans, things can sometimes go awry. Due to a family emergency, day one found us still at home and day two was spent driving for two hours to pick up the motor home, then, what seemed like almost as much time finalizing the paperwork. So, it was late in the afternoon of day two we headed north along the Hume Freeway to start our road trip.

Day 3:

After our first night in the motor home we woke on Sunday morning to a cold frosty winter’s day. At least we had bright sunshine and beautiful blue skies.

Our motor home at Wangaratta North.

Still heading north along the Hume Freeway, we soon turned off to visit the historic gold town of Chiltern.

The Main Street of Chiltern

Chiltern is very proud of its heritage and the buildings, most built in the 19th century, are beautifully maintained. In some ways, walking around this little town was like stepping back in time. The local people were friendly and strangers in the street would smile and say, “G’day”.

Masonic Hall

The Court House – built in 1865

Side view of the Court House

Federal Standard Newspaper Office – built in 1860

Bank of Australasia – now a Tea House with fine food and hand crafts

My wife and I visited the Old Chiltern Bank Tea House (28 Conness Street, Chiltern, Victoria 3683). We were tempted to try the delicious looking cakes but resisted and just had coffee.

The new owner greeted us in a friendly manner and made us welcome. We pledged to return one day for an extended stay and both of us agreed this beautiful old bank would be the perfect place to stay as the bank residence is currently being renovated and soon to be used for accommodation.

The Old Chiltern Bank Tea House can  be contacted here:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/TheOldChilternBank/about/

Chiltern Vet Clinic

The above photo, now the local vet’s office, has signs that give clues to this building’s former existence – “Kodak supplies” and “Enlargements”.

 

Star Hotel – at the height of the gold rush, Chiltern had 12 hotels

The original Blacksmith Building


Doorway to the Old Blacksmith Building

Athenaeum Museum Annex

Many of the well preserved buildings of Chiltern are registered with the National Trust. So if driving the Hume Freeway in Victoria, I would highly recommend taking a short detour and visiting this historic town.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

The above photos were all taken using an iPhone 7 Plus.

2016 -Coming to an End

2016 is fast coming to an end. I thought it might be interesting to share with you some photographs I snapped over the course of the year.

There is no rhyme or reason to these images, they are more a pictorial diary of my year.

City Skyline

No1 – The city skyline of Melbourne.

During the school holidays I was called upon to look after two of my grandchildren. I snapped this shot from the waterfront at Williamstown, looking across Hobson”s Bay, while we were talking an evening walk.

Murray Street Bridge

No2 – Barongarook Creek Bridge.

I had seen a 19th century postcard taken from almost the same spot I stood to take this photograph. It was my intention to attempt emulating his work.

The postcard photographer would have been standing in the middle of what is now the Princes Highway. There were two reasons I chose to stand on the footpath to take my shot. The first is the busyness of the highway (the main carriageway in and out of Colac) and the tree to the left of the bridge would have blocked out the old Post Office and the old Shire Hall.

Lake Bullen Merri

No3 – Lake Bullen Merri.

This lake is near Camperdown, a small town near where I live. Though reasonably close to my home, I had not visited the area for sometime.

Sunrise Memorial Square

No4 – Memorial Square.

This Memorial is situated on the main street of Colac, near where I live.

Otway Range

No5 – Otway Ranges

The seaside town of Apollo Bay sits at the foot of the range of mountains simply known as the Otways. Here the houses seemed to be dwarfed by the mountains behind them.

Lake Colac

Lake Colac

Lake Colac

Lake Colac

No6,7,8,9 – Lake Colac.

By the autumn of 2016 the lake had almost dried up. No decent rain had fallen for a couple of years and it seemed that Lake Colac would dry up completely for only the second or third time since European occupation.

Lake Colac

No10 – Lake Colac.

However winter and spring gave us some of our wettest months for a long time. And, though far from being full, it, at least, looks like a lake again.

Prince of Wales Hotel

No11 – The old Prince of Wales Inn.

The bridge in the foreground of this photograph was washed away by rushing water after a deluge that lasted all one night and most of the next day.

Storm Front

No12 – Storm Front.

I took this photograph from my front verandah. Just minutes after I clicked the shutter, the heavens opened up and I watched nature at her most fierce. I spent the next few hours in darkness as the electricity failed.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

Winter

Over the past few months I have been looking at the work of photographers who live in the northern hemisphere and the images they have posted on-line of their autumn (fall). And I must admit I have been a little envious of their very colourful autumn pictures.

I have read how our early ancestors, having arrived in this strange far off land, bemoaned the fact that Australia does not really have seasons (as they did in Europe). Our trees do not change colour in autumn; they keep their leaves in winter! To fix this problem, many English Elm trees were planted in the streets of our towns. Parks were also planted with these English trees. Today many of these trees would be about 100 years old or more. They are battling old age and disease. They are the only trees to change colour in autumn and winter.

The following images were taken several years ago in a small town not far from where I live. They were taken on a cold but sunny winter’s day. They are about as close as I can get to simulating a northern hemisphere autumn.

PS: I must admit it is a bit hard to do a post like this today. We are definitely not cold here – we are expecting a top temperature of around 40 degrees celsius. Believe me it is very hot here!!

Street Scene, Camperdown

Street Scene, Camperdown

Street Scene

Street Scene #2, Camperdown – The streets are lined with English Elms planted by our ancestors

Street Scene

The historic Clock Tower with the Elm Tree-lined park

Stepping Back In Time

Near where I live there is a small village which I pass through regularly on my way to the coast. It’s called Birregurra. Just before the holidays I found myself in this village and I stopped for coffee in one of the cafes. There are times when the Main Street is deserted of cars, and it is very easy to imagine a street filled with horses and carts – just like stepping back in time. Many of the buildings were built back in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

Historical Centre

Historical Centre

Historical Centre #2

Historical Centre #2

Post Office

Birregurra Post Office

The Drapery - Circa 1911

The Drapery – Circa 1911

Old Bank

The Old Bank

 

79 Main Street, Birregurra

79 Main Street, Birregurra