Magpie-lark #2

The following photographs are of an Australian native Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca). I took these yesterday morning on a walk around the bird reserve near Lake Colac. As a young boy I knew these birds as Mudlarks or Peewees. The name Mudlark came from the fact these birds used mud to make their nests; Peewee came from their call “pee-wee” or “pee-o-wit”. These birds are now known to be related to other monarchs.

The first two images show a male Magpie-lark gathering mud to build a nest.

Magpie-lark gathering mud for a nest.

Magpie-lark gathering mud for a nest.

With its beak full of mud I then watched the bird fly to a tree-top in a private garden where the nest was under construction.

 

Magpie-lark

Magpie-lark gathering mud for nest building

Magpie-lark

This female Magpie-lark (identifiable by its white face and throat) was also seen feeding a short distance away. I don’t think it was the mate to the nest builder.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Tree Fuchsia

A couple of weeks ago I stumbled upon this little tree in the Botanic Gardens near where I live. I was taken by the beautiful pink flowers and was very surprised to learn the tree was a member of the Fuchsia family.

The Tree Fuchsia (Fuchsia arborescens) originated in Mexico and Central America. It is evergreen with glossy dark green foliage, dark pink buds which open to pale pink flowers.

Tree Fuchsia (Fuchsia arborescens)

Tree Fuchsia (Fuchsia arborescens)

Tree Fuchsia

Flowers of the Tree Fuchsia

Tree Fuchsia

Flowers of the Tree Fuchsia #2

Grey Butcherbird

The Grey Butcherbird (Cracticus torquatus) is an Australian native bird up to 30 centimetres in length. The upper body is grey while the underparts are white. The face and top of the head is black.

They are carnivorous and feed on insects, reptiles, small rodents and small birds. Larger prey catches will be hung in tree forks to be left for later. This is how it got its name – like a butcher hanging meat on a hook. Also its beak has a little hook on the tip.

Grey Butcher - this looked as though it was not long out of the nest.

Grey Butcherbird – this one looked as though it was not long out of the nest.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Camellia

According to Wikipedia, there are between 100 and 250 species of Camellias. They are found growing naturally in eastern and southern Asia. The images below were all taken in the Botanic Gardens at Colac.

Camellia

Pink and White Camellia

Camellia

White Camellia

 

Camellia

Red Camellia

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

Magnolia

I have just returned from a walk through the Botanic Gardens at Colac which are not far from where I live. Magnolias are one of my favourite flowers and I was pleased to see these. I have heard them called Tulip Magnolias, but according to Wikipedia they are known by many different names. They are Magnolia liliiflora.

Magnolia liliiflora - sometimes known as the Tulip Magnolia

Magnolia liliiflora – sometimes known as the Tulip Magnolia

Magnolia

Tulip Magnolia

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

White-faced Heron

The White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) is a native Australian bird with a body length up to 70 centimetres long. Their habitat includes wetlands, swamps, coastal bays and inlets where they feed on crustaceans, fish, insects and worms.

White-faced Heron at Erskine River

White-faced Heron at Erskine River

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Black-winged Stilt

The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) is a native Australian bird ranging in size between 36 to 38 centimetres. They are carnivorous and live in open freshwater wetlands, coastal bays and inlets.

They breed from August until December and are not considered endangered.

The images below were all taken at the Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve an excellent place to observe all types of  Australian birds.

The Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) in flight

The Black-winged Stilts (Himantopus himantopus) in flight with their long pink legs trailing behind!

The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) at rest.

The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) at rest.

When the flight frenzy started this little chap seemed to be saying "Wait for me! Wait for me!"

When the flight frenzy started this little chap seemed to be saying “Wait for me! Wait for me!”

The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) in flight #2

The Black-winged Stilt (Himantopus himantopus) in flight #2

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.