Australian Native Plants

The following photographs are of some of the Australian native plants I have growing in my garden. Planted many years ago, I chose those plants to attract birds to the garden, and they have not disappointed me. 

King’s Park Special Callistemon – commonly known as a Bottlebrush
King’s Park Special Callistemon – beautifully back-lit by the late afternoon sun
Bottlebrush Mauve Mist Callistemon
Bottlebrush Mauve Mist Callistemon
Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris)
Red Flowering Gum Tree (Eucalyptus ficifolia)
Captain Cook Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis)

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A Migratory Shorebird

The Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) is a small to medium wader, with a body length from 17cm to 22cm. It has a wingspan of 36 to 44 centimetres and weighs in at 65 grams. These small birds breed in northern Siberia, then before the harsh Arctic winter sets in, migrate to spend time in the Australian summer. They mostly end up in south-east Australia.

During the non-breeding season, most of the world’s population of the Sharp-tailed Sandpipers occur in Australia.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
(Calidris acuminata)

The above photo was taken at the end of October. It was my first sighting of the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper for this approaching summer. I only observed the one bird at this time.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata)

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata)

 

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
(Calidris acuminata)

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
(Calidris acuminata)

This morning, I returned to Lake Colac and was pleasantly surprised to see that the numbers of the Sharp-tailed Sandpipers had increased. There were about 12 or 13 birds feeding on this short section of shoreline – about 50 metres in length.

These waders will depart the non-breeding grounds of Australia in April next year. They will be one of the first waders to leave.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

Spotted Pardalote

At 8 – 10cms in length, the Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus) is one of Australia’s smallest birds. Over the past few weeks, I have been fortunate enough to take many photographs of this beautiful bird.

Spotted Pardalote

Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus)

The male bird is easily identified by its bright colours and white spots. So far, I have only seen the female fleetingly. She did not sit still long enough for a photo. The female Spotted Pardalote has yellow spots.

Spotted PardaloteSpotted Pardalote

The Spotted Pardalote is also called the Diamond Bird or Jewellery Bird.

Spotted PardaloteSpotted Pardalote

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Breeding Season

I have a pair of Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) resident in my backyard. Over the past few weeks, I have taken a series of photographs of the transformation of the male bird as he changes into his breeding colours.

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Male Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

The above photo shows the male bird in eclipse plumage. Other than his brighter blue tail and his black bill, for the winter he looks much like his female mate.

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Female Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

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Start of the moult – Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

Within a few days of my first photo, the start of the moult was evident.

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Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus)

As the days go by, his breeding colours become more evident.

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Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus)

In this photo the moult is complete. He proudly wears his full breeding colours.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Nature at Agnes Water

Recently I spent a few days at Agnes Water in Central Queensland. Agnes Water is a coastal town just south of the Tropic of Capricorn, so it is an ideal place to escape the harsh winter of my part of Australia.

The following photos are just a few of the species I encountered in the natural world of Agnes Water.

 

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Australian Monitor Lizard – commonly known as a Goanna

Our holiday accommodation faced east, and was high up on a hill, so watching the sunrise each morning was a delight.

 

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Sunrise at Agnes Water

This Australasian Figbird (Sphecotheres vieilloti) was enjoying her breakfast in a nearby, well, fig tree.

 

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Australasian Figbird
Sphecotheres vieilloti

As I stood on the veranda, waiting to see which birds would appear, my attention was drawn to this Brown House Spider (Steatoda sp) backlit by the early morning sun.

 

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Brown House Spider
Steatoda sp

 

 

When I saw this Grevillea in a local park, I knew it would not be long before one of the many Blue-faced Honeyeaters (Entomyzon cyanotis) appeared.

 

P8137047-Grevillea.jpg

Grevillea

 

 

Blue-faced Honeyeater

Blue-faced Honeyeater 
Entomyzon cyanotis

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

Nature Walk

The following photos were taken over the past few days when I included the Botanic Gardens in my nature walk.

 

Oleander-leaved Protea

Oleander-leaved Protea
(Protea neriifolia)
White Form

 

Oleander-leaved Protea

Oleander-leaved Protea (Protea neriifolia) White Form

Bottle Brush Kunzea

Bottle Brush Kunzea
(Kunzea baxteri)

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Bottle Brush Kunzea
(Kunzea baxteri)

P8016912-River Wattle.jpg

River Wattle
(Acacia cognata)
Lime Magic, Mimosaceae

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Backyard Birds

Of all the birds that visit my backyard, the Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans) would outnumber them all. During our recent bouts of bad weather, I have kept myself amused by pointing my lens towards these birds as they came to feed. It was a good opportunity to highlight the birds in their different plumages at different stages of immaturity.

Crimson Rosella

Adult Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Adult Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

In the above photo, this Juvenile/Immature Crimson Rosella was intent on protecting his place in the queue to gain access to the feeding bowl.

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

This pair of birds at the feeding bowl are almost, but not quite, at the same stage of immaturity.

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

The above Crimson Rosella is almost at full adult plumage.

Crimson Rosella

Adult Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.