Outside my Back Door #2

In keeping with the theme from yesterday’s post, the following images are of a pair of Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) which visit a small bush outside my kitchen window every day. There, when they aren’t eating insects, they cozy up to each other and go through the courting process. The male, not yet in his full breeding colours, is starting to change colour. Soon his head will be a brilliant blue colour.

Closeness - enjoying the sun together on a cool Spring morning.

Closeness – enjoying the sun together on a cool Spring morning.

Over the past few weeks I have taken many photographs of these birds. I feel so honoured and privileged that they have allowed me the opportunity.

Something for the nest perhaps?

Something for the nest perhaps?

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Outside my Back Door

There are times I am so amazed at what I find just outside my book door. But then I shouldn’t be, as I am a firm believer in the saying: “There are a thousand pictures within ten minutes of home.”

The first image is of an Australian King Parrot which was no further than ten metres from my back door. I saw him land in the Wattle Tree and start feasting on the seeds.

Australian King Parrot feeding on the Wattle Tree seeds.

Australian King Parrot feeding on the Wattle Tree seeds.

The next image is of a butterfly taking nectar and was no more than three metres from the back door.

I'm not very good at identifying butterflies. I believe this is an Australian Painted Lady - but feel free to correct me if I am wrong.

I’m not very good at identifying butterflies. I believe this is an Australian Painted Lady – but feel free to correct me if I am wrong.

And of course the busy bees were buzzing near the butterfly.

Busy Bee

Busy Bee

Bee, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Busy Bee #2

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Callistemon

Bottlebrushes (named because the flower spike resembles the traditional bottle brush) are members of the genus Callistemon and belong to the family Myrtaceae. There are 40 species currently called Callistemon.

Bottle Brush - Spikes of flowers

Bottle Brush – Flower spike.

Bottle Brush - Flower Buds.

Bottle Brush – Flower Buds.

Bottle Brush, Callistemon, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Bottle Brush Flower Buds #2

Bottle Brush, Callistemon, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Bottle Brush – Flower Spike #2

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

A Bridge to Cross

I have walked this path, and crossed this bridge, too many times to remember. Usually I approach it from the other direction. Yesterday, on a perfect late Spring day, the sun was shining brightly, but the light was starting to fade fast as the sun slowly slipped towards the horizon and a mundane scene was magically converted to a beautiful picture by the back lighting of the foliage and the sun’s reflection off the wooden bridge.

A bridge to Cross - Barongarook Creek

A bridge to Cross – Barongarook Creek

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Imperial Jezebel

The Imperial Jezebel Delias harpalyce butterflies are one of the first to appear in spring and fly throughout the year. They are native to South-eastern Australia except Tasmania.

Imperial Jezebel (Delias harpalyce)

Imperial Jezebel (Delias harpalyce)

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Banksia

I came across these beautiful Banksias during a walk in the local Botanic Gardens.

Banksias are native to Australia; and were named after Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820 ), who, in 1770, was the first European to collect specimens of these plants. Banks was a botanist aboard the Endeavour with Captain James Cook during his voyage of discovery up the east coast of Australia in 1770.

There are 173 species of Banksia.

Banksia

Banksia

Banksia

Banksia #2

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Superb Fairy-wren

For the past two weeks this pair of Superb Fairy-wrens have kept me entertained as they gather insects from the kitchen window.

Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) are small birds of 14 centimetres in length. I have taken many photos of them over the past fortnight and I would like to share my favourites with you.

Male Superb Fairy-wren

Male Superb Fairy-wren

Superb Fairy-wren

Female Superb Fairy-wren

Superb Fairy-wren, Malurus cyaneus, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Taking time out from eating. Time to get to know each other a little better.

Superb Fairy-wren

The female Superb Fairy-wren – having a good look for some lunch.

Superb Fairy-wren

Taking some more time out!

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.