Pin-cushion Hakea

The Pin-cushion Hakea (Hakea laurina) is a superb Australia Native Plant endemic to South-west Australia, however is grown widely throughout Australia and overseas.

The following photographs are of the flower of this small tree.

Pin-cushion Hakea

Pin-cushion Hakea

Meaning of the name: Hakea laurina

Hakea: after the 20th century botanist Baron von Hake.

laurina: because of the laurel like leaves.

Pin-cushion Hakea

Pin-cushion HakeaPin-cushion Hakea

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Advertisements

Prickly Paperbark

The following photos are of an Australian Native Plant the Prickly Paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides), which I planted in my front yard many years ago. This summer they were in full bloom giving me the best display I’ve ever seen from them.

Prickly Paperbark

Paperbarks got their name because the bark of these trees look like paper. Early settlers used the bark to light campfires when making tea. This gave them their nickname, “Tea Tree”.

Prickly Paperbark

With over 200 species of Melaleuca in Australia, only a few are trees. It is endemic to Australia, with Melaleuca forests, mainly in northern regions, covering some 6.5 million hectares.

These forests are important habitat for many birds such as egrets, herons, and spoonbills. Oils, e.g. Tea Tree Oil, come from the foliage of some species of Melaleuca.

Melaleuca derives from the Greek, melas (black) and leukos (white).

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Dahlias in the Gardens

The following photos were taken during a recent walk through the Colac Botanic Gardens.

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Magnolia grandiflora

One of my favourite flowers is the Magnolia grandiflora, or Southern Magnolia. This tree, a member of the family Magnoliaceae, is native to the southeastern United States.

This photograph was taken a couple of days ago at the Colac Botanic Gardens.

Southern Magnolia

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

After the Rain

Last year was one of our wettest winters for many years. After a decade of drought, it seemed as though Mother Nature was trying to making amends in just one winter. In my part of Australia winter is the wettest part of the year. However, as winter continued it appeared as though the rain was not going to stop.

When winter became spring (at least by the calendar) the wet and cold weather continued. Spring was disguised as winter.

But, Mother Nature made amends by giving us some of the best showings of our Australian Native trees and plants. I had never seen such displays of beauty!

One of my favourite trees, the Red Flowering Eucalyptus Tree (Corymbia ficifolia) was no exception.

Red Flowering Eucalyptus Tree

Red Flowering Eucalyptus Tree

The Red Flowering Eucalyptus Tree is native to south coastal Western Australia. These photographs were taken in the Colac Botanical Gardens, in regional Victoria. The tree does very well in this area and is also used by the local Council for streetscaping.

Red Flowering Eucalyptus Tree

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

The First of Spring

Spring has arrived in Australia and all the signs are there:

The Welcome Swallows (Hirundo neoxena) are swooping around my house, Dragonflies are seen in the garden, and of course the first Butterfly is fluttering around the spring flowers.

Australian Painted Ladies (Vanessa kershawi) are one of the first butterflies to emerge in spring. Their flight season ranges from August to May.

My first sighting of an Australian Painted Lady this spring.

My first sighting of an Australian Painted Lady this spring.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Banksia

The Banksia is a native Australian tree or bush. The following three images illustrate perfectly the life of the flower spike which is much sort after as a food source by nectarivorous animals, including birds, bats, rats, possums, stingless bees and a host of invertebrates. The flowers are also of an economic importance to the Australian nursery and flower industry.

These images were taken at the Geelong Botanic Gardens in autumn. The first photograph shows the flower in its perfect state.

The flower spike of a Banksia

The flower spike of a Banksia

The next image shows a flower spike after it has been visited by a nectar seeking bird or other animal.

This flower spike shows distinctive signs of being visited by nectar seeking animals.

This flower spike shows distinctive signs of being visited by nectar seeking animals.

And, finally, a flower spike which has no, or very little, nectar left to share.

A flower spike with no nectar left.

A flower spike with no nectar left.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.