A Crimson Rosella in the Melaleuca

Every afternoon, I have noticed this Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans) sitting quietly in my Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris) tree. Sometimes it is alone; sometimes with friends. It is dining out on the seeds left behind now the flowers have all died.

The Bracelet Honey Myrtle is native to south-east Australia and flowers in summer.

 

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Bracelet Honey Myrtle

Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris)

Bracelet Honey Myrtle

Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris)

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

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From Green to Red

On my walk through the Botanic Gardens this morning, I saw that the Manchurian Pear tree (Pyrus ussuriensis) was transitioning to autumn colours, i.e. from green to red.

Manchurian PearManchurian PearManchurian Pear

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

A Walk in the Gardens

Weather-wise, Easter Saturday was perfect. So while visiting the city of Hamilton in western Victoria a visit to the Botanic Gardens was a pleasant experience.

Hamilton GardensHamilton Gardens, Botanic Gardens, Hamilton, Victoria, AustraliaHamilton Gardens, Botanic Gardens, Hamilton, Victoria, Australia

Hamilton Gardens

The restored Gardener’s Cottage – Hamilton Botanic Gardens

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Autumn

In Australia, today (1st March) is the official start of autumn.

One of my favourite trees for autumn colour, known in Australia as the Lipstick Tree,  or October Glory (Acer rubrum). It is a native tree of North America. The following photos were taken at the Colac Botanic Gardens, over the past couple of autumns.

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P1010009-Lipstick Tree.jpg

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Eucalyptus calophylla rosea

The flowering gums have been showing beautifully in Colac lately. While they are native to West Australia there are some excellent species in full flower in the Botanic Gardens. There are also some been planted by the Shire Council along some of the city streets.

These pictures are of the Eucalyptus calophylla rosea which is planted in our yard. This tree must be over thirty years old now, and every summer gives us outstanding blossoms, like these.

Eucalyptus calophylla roseaEucalyptus calophylla roseaEucalyptus calophylla rosea

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Pin-cushion Hakea

The Pin-cushion Hakea (Hakea laurina) is a superb Australia Native Plant endemic to South-west Australia, however is grown widely throughout Australia and overseas.

The following photographs are of the flower of this small tree.

Pin-cushion Hakea

Pin-cushion Hakea

Meaning of the name: Hakea laurina

Hakea: after the 20th century botanist Baron von Hake.

laurina: because of the laurel like leaves.

Pin-cushion Hakea

Pin-cushion HakeaPin-cushion Hakea

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Prickly Paperbark

The following photos are of an Australian Native Plant the Prickly Paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides), which I planted in my front yard many years ago. This summer they were in full bloom giving me the best display I’ve ever seen from them.

Prickly Paperbark

Paperbarks got their name because the bark of these trees look like paper. Early settlers used the bark to light campfires when making tea. This gave them their nickname, “Tea Tree”.

Prickly Paperbark

With over 200 species of Melaleuca in Australia, only a few are trees. It is endemic to Australia, with Melaleuca forests, mainly in northern regions, covering some 6.5 million hectares.

These forests are important habitat for many birds such as egrets, herons, and spoonbills. Oils, e.g. Tea Tree Oil, come from the foliage of some species of Melaleuca.

Melaleuca derives from the Greek, melas (black) and leukos (white).

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.