Using Expired Film

As a photographer, I know that using expired film has inherent risks. However, over the years, I have used expired film and I have never been disappointed-until now!

The film I used for this project was about 20 years old. It was Kodak Black and White 35mm print film, ISO 400. It was designed to be processed in C41 chemicals. 

A card, attached to the box containing the film, has the following printed on it:

Make Time Stand Still in Black & White

  • Extremely fine grain and outstanding sharpness make this film ideal for enlargements.
  • Processed at any photofinisher with standard color processing.

Do not process in black and white chemicals.

My first impression of the film is simply it is an extremely grainy film; certainly, there is more grain than the Kodak Tri-X 400 film I have been using recently. Or, has it become more grainy with age?

Failure (shown for an example only) -the first photo on the roll.

There were a few failures like the above photo. I am thinking that the age of the film has played a large part in these failures.

A side view of the Camperdown Post Office, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

Like many towns in regional areas of Australia, there are many heritage or historic buildings, many built in the 19th century or early 20th century. Post offices played an important role for the people of these areas, often isolated from the rest of the world.

The Old Shire Hall, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

The Hampden Shire Hall, designed by leading Melbourne architects Smith and Johnson, was built in 1886. The architects designed the building in a Lombardic Romanesque style. It was constructed by local contractors McAllister and Stansmore.

I must admit the old Hampden Shire Hall is my favourite building in Camperdown.

Old Court House, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

The Old Court House was erected in 1886-87 by W. A. Moore, contractor. It replaced an earlier wooden structure of 1859. It was designed by architect G. B. H. Austin of the Public Works Department, who designed it in a medieval Gothic Revival style.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

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I spy…

A walk around a small town not far from where I live revealed just how many photographic opportunities abound when one is willing to open one’s eyes and mind.

Many years ago I was told: “There are 10 thousand pictures within 10 minutes of home.” Those words have stayed with me ever since and are foremost in my mind whenever I pick up my camera and venture out.

So, in this instance, it was a case of “I spy with my little eye something beginning with O. Old!”

The Old Wooden Shed, Beeac

An old wooden shed down a side street, with its weathered timber and slight lean, was a certain candidate for a photograph.

Old Bedford Truck

They don’t make them like this anymore! No plastic in this blast from the past – an old Bedford truck once a common sight on our roads.

Old Common School

The Common School is now a private residence. Built in 1868, this bluestone building has had many uses – first as a school, then between 1923 and 2004, it was the Presbyterian Sunday School. It has been used as a hall by many other organisations also.

The above photographs were all taken using a Nikon EM SLR film camera loaded with Kodak Tri-X 400 black and white film.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

A Migratory Shorebird

The Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata) is a small to medium wader, with a body length from 17cm to 22cm. It has a wingspan of 36 to 44 centimetres and weighs in at 65 grams. These small birds breed in northern Siberia, then before the harsh Arctic winter sets in, migrate to spend time in the Australian summer. They mostly end up in south-east Australia.

During the non-breeding season, most of the world’s population of the Sharp-tailed Sandpipers occur in Australia.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
(Calidris acuminata)

The above photo was taken at the end of October. It was my first sighting of the Sharp-tailed Sandpiper for this approaching summer. I only observed the one bird at this time.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata)

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper (Calidris acuminata)

 

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
(Calidris acuminata)

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper
(Calidris acuminata)

This morning, I returned to Lake Colac and was pleasantly surprised to see that the numbers of the Sharp-tailed Sandpipers had increased. There were about 12 or 13 birds feeding on this short section of shoreline – about 50 metres in length.

These waders will depart the non-breeding grounds of Australia in April next year. They will be one of the first waders to leave.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

Spotted Pardalote

At 8 – 10cms in length, the Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus) is one of Australia’s smallest birds. Over the past few weeks, I have been fortunate enough to take many photographs of this beautiful bird.

Spotted Pardalote

Spotted Pardalote (Pardalotus punctatus)

The male bird is easily identified by its bright colours and white spots. So far, I have only seen the female fleetingly. She did not sit still long enough for a photo. The female Spotted Pardalote has yellow spots.

Spotted PardaloteSpotted Pardalote

The Spotted Pardalote is also called the Diamond Bird or Jewellery Bird.

Spotted PardaloteSpotted Pardalote

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Breeding Season

I have a pair of Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus) resident in my backyard. Over the past few weeks, I have taken a series of photographs of the transformation of the male bird as he changes into his breeding colours.

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Male Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

The above photo shows the male bird in eclipse plumage. Other than his brighter blue tail and his black bill, for the winter he looks much like his female mate.

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Female Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

P8317608-Superb Fairy-wren.jpg

Start of the moult – Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

Within a few days of my first photo, the start of the moult was evident.

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Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus)

As the days go by, his breeding colours become more evident.

P9168139-Superb Fairy-wren.jpg

Superb Fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus)

In this photo the moult is complete. He proudly wears his full breeding colours.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Nature at Agnes Water

Recently I spent a few days at Agnes Water in Central Queensland. Agnes Water is a coastal town just south of the Tropic of Capricorn, so it is an ideal place to escape the harsh winter of my part of Australia.

The following photos are just a few of the species I encountered in the natural world of Agnes Water.

 

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Australian Monitor Lizard – commonly known as a Goanna

Our holiday accommodation faced east, and was high up on a hill, so watching the sunrise each morning was a delight.

 

P8137024-Sunrise.jpg

Sunrise at Agnes Water

This Australasian Figbird (Sphecotheres vieilloti) was enjoying her breakfast in a nearby, well, fig tree.

 

P8137030-Australasian Figbird.jpg

Australasian Figbird
Sphecotheres vieilloti

As I stood on the veranda, waiting to see which birds would appear, my attention was drawn to this Brown House Spider (Steatoda sp) backlit by the early morning sun.

 

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Brown House Spider
Steatoda sp

 

 

When I saw this Grevillea in a local park, I knew it would not be long before one of the many Blue-faced Honeyeaters (Entomyzon cyanotis) appeared.

 

P8137047-Grevillea.jpg

Grevillea

 

 

Blue-faced Honeyeater

Blue-faced Honeyeater 
Entomyzon cyanotis

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

Nature Walk

The following photos were taken over the past few days when I included the Botanic Gardens in my nature walk.

 

Oleander-leaved Protea

Oleander-leaved Protea
(Protea neriifolia)
White Form

 

Oleander-leaved Protea

Oleander-leaved Protea (Protea neriifolia) White Form

Bottle Brush Kunzea

Bottle Brush Kunzea
(Kunzea baxteri)

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Bottle Brush Kunzea
(Kunzea baxteri)

P8016912-River Wattle.jpg

River Wattle
(Acacia cognata)
Lime Magic, Mimosaceae

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.