Visiting Brisbane Gardens

A couple of months ago, I had the opportunity to visit the Brisbane Botanic Gardens.

This tree grabbed my attention for two reasons. The first being the brilliant flowers it was displaying; the second, the noise that was emanating from it. It was the cacophony of Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) feeding on the nectar contained in the flowers.

The tree was a Colville’s Glory (Colvillea racemosa) a native legume of Madagascar.

Colville’s Glory (Colvillea racemosa) at the Brisbane Botanic Gardens
Colville’s Glory (Colvillea racemosa) at the Brisbane Botanic Gardens
Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) at the Brisbane Botanic Gardens
Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) at the Brisbane Botanic Gardens
Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) at the Brisbane Botanic Gardens
Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) at the Brisbane Botanic Gardens

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

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Last Roll

Recently I loaded my last roll of Kodacolor 200 film into my Kodak Retinette 11 rangefinder camera. This roll of film was well and truly past its use-by date. However, I had shot other rolls of this film from this batch with no problems.

Wall Art, Hosier Lane, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

The next two photographs were not the result I was expecting.

Laneway, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Laneway, Hosier Lane, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Though grainy I am not unhappy with the results.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Corner Store

As a young child growing up, the corner store was a big part of my family’s domestic life. The supermarket, as we know it today, did not exist. The local grocer supplied our weekly groceries. The corner store was for buying things we had run out of, or for little luxuries, such as soft drinks, ice creams, lollies and other such items.

While the corner store still exists, many of these small businesses are struggling to compete with mega-supermarkets where so many of us do our grocery shopping these days.

On a recent trip to the Melbourne suburb of Yarraville, I took some photos of corner stores.

Corner Store, Yarraville
Corner Store, Yarraville

For the above photos, I used Kodak Gold film loaded in my Kodak Retinette 1A camera.

Corner Store, Yarraville
Corner Store, Yarraville

A few days later, I returned with my Nikon EM loaded with Kodak Tri-X 400 black and white film.

Corner Store, Yarraville

The corner store in the above photo is in another part of Yarraville. I have wanted to take this photo for a while now, and I wanted to use black and white film. Its weathered boards and peeling paint cry out to be the subject of a black and white photograph.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Getting Up Close

I am often amazed at how close some wild birds will allow me to get. Slow steady movement is required; any sudden moves and the subject is gone.

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita)

This Sulphur-crested Cockatoo had landed on a branch near my back deck. Although nervous, it allowed me to get within a couple of metres, and take this portrait.

Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

This portrait of a young Australian King Parrot was a little easier to take. On a hot summer’s day, it was intent on getting a cool drink.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved.

Thoughts…

The purpose of this post is to share my thoughts on my film photography. It’s been a little over a year since I took my old cameras and some rolls of film out of the cupboard and started re-using them.

My first thought is how much my photography has been rejuvenated. Now, I’m not getting into the argument of film photography is better than digital or vice versa. Both have their place. I will still be using my digital camera, particularly for bird photography.

A baby Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus) captured by a digital camera.

Think more; shoot less is a sage piece of advice. Thinking more about the shot I am about to take is paramount to my film photography. Unlike digital photography, where I can take multiple shots of my subject, film is too expensive to do that.

Lake Colac, Victoria, Australia

The above photograph was taken using a Kodak Retinette Rangefinder camera loaded with Kodacolor film. This roll of film was probably the first roll to be used in this camera for close on forty years.

Yarraville, Victoria, Australia

This photograph was taken using my Nikon EM SLR, also loaded with Kodacolor film. Both these rolls of Kodacolor film were bought in 2005 and were well past their expiry date. They had been stored in a cool dark place and showed no ill effects. I exposed them at box speed (ISO 200).

The Old Farm Shed, Irrewarra, Victoria, Australia

The Old Farm Shed was taken using a Nikon EM SLR loaded with Kodak Tri-X 400 Black and White film.

Finally, the anticipation of seeing the results once the exposed film has been developed, printed and scanned is so different from what I get from seeing instantly my digital shots.

Please Note:
Fred O’Donnell Photography is the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.


Historic Camperdown

Continuing from a previous post, Using Expired Film, the following photographs are of some of the historic buildings which are found in the small country town of Camperdown. In an ever-changing world, many small towns use their past history as a means of attracting tourists to their area.

Old Leura Hotel, Camperdown, Victoria. Built 1857-59

The Leura Hotel is the earliest hotel in Camperdown, built for P. Douglas and J. Stevenson in 1857-59. Bluestone stables were added in 1860 by a new owner D.S. Walker and used by Cobb and Co. as a coach terminal and office.

Masonic Hall, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

The Masonic Hall of Camperdown is built of rubble blue-stone. It was designed by one of the lodge members, John Young. It was constructed in 1867-68 and is one of the oldest surviving, continuously used purpose-built Masonic Lodges in Victoria.

Old I.O.O.F Hall, Camperdown-built 1896

Once the meeting place of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the hall is now the home of the Camperdown Historic Society.

Mechanics Institute, Camperdown, Victoria
Hampden Hotel, Camperdown, Victoria

The above photographs were taken using Kodak Black and White 35mm print film. The camera was a Nikon EM SLR.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Lake Colac Foreshore

Just prior to sunset recently, was a perfect time for a walk along the southern foreshore of Lake Colac. There was enough bird activity to keeper the birders happy.

Eastern Great Egret, Ardea modesta at Lake Colac

The Eastern Great Egrets were all facing into the wind. A couple were feeding, however, the remainder seemed to be bracing themselves against the stiff breeze that was blowing.

Eastern Great Egret, Ardea modesta, Lake Colac, Victoria, Australia
White-headed Stilt (Himantopus leucocephalus) Lake Colac
White-headed Stilt (Himantopus leucocephalus) Lake Colac

A pair of White-headed Stilts (Himantopus leucocephalus) were feeding in the shallows.

Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles) Lake Colac

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.