Superb Fairy-wrens

The Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) has been voted as Australia’s favourite bird. And, when the male is in full breeding colours, it is easy to see why he is such a standout.

The following photographs are of a pair the have been appearing in my backyard for about 5 or 6 years, now. They have given me great joy being able to watch their antics and the satisfaction of capturing their photo on numerous occassions.

Male Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) in full breeding colours
Female Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

This breeding season, however, a new pair seem to have moved into the neighbourhood. They were difficult to capture with the camera, but my persistence eventually paid off.

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

She stopped long enough for a sing-song. Perhaps she was happy to be chased my this handsome male.

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

Like many small birds, they move fast and do not stop in one spot for long. This pair were no exception and I consider myself fortunate to have a record of their visit.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

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Williamstown Gardens

The following photographs were taken yesterday on a short visit to the Williamstown Botanical Gardens. The official start to Spring is still a few days away, however, if one kept out of the chilly breeze, one would think it had started a little early.

Flowers, Botanic Gardens, Williamstown, Victoria, Australia

By chance, the entry I used had me walking towards the sun. A lot of what I saw was backlit; not a bad thing.

A Handsome Bird

While not as colourful as other birds that visit my backyard, the Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica) is still a handsome bird, in my opinion.

Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)
Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)
Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Breeding Season

As we approach spring here, in Australia, breeding season is about to start for many of our birds. Recently, on a visit to the Botanic Gardens at Williamstown, I photographed a pair of Long-billed Corellas which had made their nest in the hollow of a Palm Tree.

Usually, these birds would find a hollow in a large Eucalypt. Long-billed Corellas breed from August until December and will lay two to four eggs.

Long-billed Corellas (Cacatua tenuirostris)

Galahs become mates for life and form permanent pairs. Easily identified by her red irises, the female will lay 2 – 4 eggs.

Breeding season for Galahs, in the south of Australia, is July to December.

A mated pair of Galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus)
A female Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

In this photograph, the female bird has a dirty face, which she would have gotten from working on her nesting hollow.

Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosellas (Platycercus elegans) breed from September to January. They nest in tree hollows high in tall Eucalypts, laying four to eight eggs.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Hide and Seek

This male Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) played a game of hide and seek with me. As I sat on my front verandah, he kept his eyes firmly on me. Then, for just a split second, he came into clear sight, framed by the foliage he was using to hide behind.

Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

The male Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) is the only Australian parrot with a redhead.

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Another Close Encounter

In a previous post, I wrote and shared photos, of how I was able to get up close to a Sulphur-crested Cockatoo. A couple of days ago, I had the same experience with an Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis).

Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Galahs in the Garden

The following photographs are the result of a quick walk around my yard, camera in hand.

The Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus) is an endemic species of Cockatoo recorded only in Australia. It is coloured grey and pink. There are three races: Race roseicapillus; Race albiceps; Race kuhli.

A mated pair of Galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus) share a moment
Female Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

A female Galah is easily identified by her red irises.
Judging by the dirty face of this female, it appears she has been busy in the tree hollow tending to her motherly duties. Breeding season for Galahs, in the south of Australia, is July to December. She will lay 2 – 4 eggs.

Forming permanent pairs, Galahs become mates for life. Their young will have duller colours with grey about the face and breast.

Another female Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.