Jawbone Reserve

Last Sunday I was able to spend some time at Jawbone Reserve to observe the water birds. The images below are some of the different species I was able to photograph.

The website of Parks Victoria describes Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve as: Once a highly degraded site, Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve has been transformed into an ecological haven and a place of beauty for the whole community.

Resting Ducks

Resting Ducks

Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax varius)

Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax varius)

Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra)

Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra)

Purple Swamp Hen (Porphyrio porphyrio)

Purple Swamp Hen (Porphyrio porphyrio)

Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)

Black Swan (Cygnus atratus)

Please Note: All images appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Shadows

On a cold start to a winter’s morning, with a mix of sunshine and fog, I thought there would be an opportunity to make a good photograph. I have heard it said that there are one thousand photographs within ten minutes of home and this image falls into that category. In fact only about five minutes walk from my home!!

This is my favourite shot from the morning’s photo shoot.

Shadows

Shadows

Little Black Cormorant

The Little Black Cormorant (Phalacrocorax sulcirostris) is a small black bird with a lead-grey bill between 60 and 65 centimetres in size. They will be found in most aquatic habitats and are known to hunt co-operatively with Australian Pelicans.

Resting on rocks in Hobson Bay, Williamstown, Australia

Resting on rocks in Hobson Bay, Williamstown, Australia

After diving the Little Black Cormorant will hang out its wings to dry!!

After diving the Little Black Cormorant will hang out its wings to dry!!

Hanging out to drive #2

Hanging out to dry #2

Please Note: All images appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Tree in Fog

Yesterday morning I went for a walk along the southern shore of Lake Colac. On arrival there was a thick fog which blanketed out the lake. I took several photographs and this one is my favourite.

English Elm on the southern bank of Lake Colac

English Elm on the southern bank of Lake Colac

Please Note: All images appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Little Pied Cormorant

The Little Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos) is a small version of the Pied Cormorant. It is up to 55 centimetres long. Its distinctive markings are: A black upper body, with white underneath. It has a short yellow to brown bill.

It is a carnivore and catches fish and yabbies by diving under water. Its habitat consists of wetlands, swamps and coastal bays.

The Little Pied Cormorant is native to Australia. It is not considered to be endangered.

Little Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos) on the bank of Barongarook Creek

Little Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax melanoleucos) on the bank of Barongarook Creek

Little Pied Cormorant

Little Pied Cormorant

Please Note: All images appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Magpie-lark

As a young boy growing up in Queensland, I always knew this bird as a Peewee. This was because of its call pee-wee or pee-o-wit. When I moved to Victoria it was known as a Mudlark, so called, because of its habit of building its nest out of mud.

I have since learned its correct name is: Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca).

It is a black and white coloured bird with a white bill and eye about 27 centimetres in size. The female has a white face and throat.

This Magpie-lark was seen preening on the banks of the Barongarook Creek.

This Magpie-lark was seen preening on the banks of the Barongarook Creek.

Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca)

Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca)

Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca) - continuing with its preening!

Magpie-lark (Grallina cyanoleuca) – continuing with its preening!

 

For reference I consult the Simpson & Day Field Guide to the Birds of Australia. I have the fifth edition, however I believe there is now a sixth edition.

Please Note: All images appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

Australian King Parrots #2

Every now and then King Parrots (Alisterus scapularis) turn up at the feeders I have in my garden. Last time they came, the birds were very approachable and I was very surprised how close they allowed me to get to them. These birds which turned up this morning we very wary, and I quickly learned that I had to keep my distance.

Australian King Parrot at feeder - an old tin plate nailed to a post!!

Australian King Parrot at feeder – an old tin plate nailed to a post!!

The colouring of this bird suggests a female or an immature bird. Perhaps this was the reason for its wariness!!

This Australian King Parrot claimed the second feeder!

This Australian King Parrot claimed the second feeder!