White-faced Heron

The White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) is the most common heron seen in Australia. They will be found anywhere there is water, such as mudflats, most wetlands, creeks and farm dams. They have also been known to adapt to urban areas.

 

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White-faced Heron Egretta novaehollandiae

In the above photo, this White-faced Heron was on the hunt in a dried up part of Lake Colac. Although, it was only about 5 or 6 metres from the water’s edge.

 

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White-faced Heron Egretta novaehollandiae

This Heron was seen strutting out in Barongarook Creek. This part of the creek is between two main roads and only a short distance from the city business district. Despite this, I have found this creek to be a good spot for finding waterbirds.

Adult White-faced Herons grow between 60 to 70 centimetres with 65cms being the average size. Their breeding season is from October to December and the clutch is usually 3 or 4 eggs. In a good wet season, it could be double that and the breeding season could be extended. The nest is an untidy bundle of sticks in a tree.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

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Birds of Lake Colac

These are just a few of the waterbirds that call Lake Colac their home.

From my vantage point, I was able to see what appeared to be several hundred Australian Pelicans (Pelecanus conspicillatus) resting on the water’s edge. The following photos show only a fraction of their numbers.

 

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Australian Pelicans
(Pelecanus conspicillatus)

 

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Australian Pelicans
(Pelecanus conspicillatus)

An Australian White Ibis (Threskiornis molucca), flushed from the reeds in front of me, voiced its displeasure as it flew off.

Australian White Ibis

As I walked west, I accidentally stumbled upon this White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) feeding quietly in a hollow.

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Sacred Kingfisher

Back in late Spring and early Summer, as I walked around the foreshore of Lake Colac, and along the banks of Barongarook Creek, I was asked by birders: “Have you seen the Kingfisher?” Disappointedly I would answer “No”. Over the next weeks, I would keep a sharp eye open for this elusive Kingfisher but to no avail. I would hang around spots where others had seen this bird and I would leave disappointed.

Today on my walk, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a flash of bright blue fly down to the bank of the creek and then up into the tree just opposite me, on the other side of the creek. It was the Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) which had eluded me all summer!

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Film – Kodacolor

The results are in! After more than a decade, I have put a roll of Kodak High Definition colour film (ASA 200) in my old Nikon EM SLR which I bought back in the mid-1980s and completed a photoshoot.
The film was stored in a cupboard all that time, and I had no concerns that it would still be in good condition. The exposed film was taken to a camera shop where it was developed and printed, and I also had scans made.
I was very happy with the results, however, I felt that the scans were flat. As a result, the photos posted here have been slightly adjusted in my software.

 

Old Yarraville Post Office

The Old Yarraville Post Office

 

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Sun Theatre, Yarraville

 

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Flinders Street Station

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

Birds of Balyang Sanctuary

Yesterday, I got the opportunity to spend a couple of hours at Balyang Sanctuary, one of my favourite spots for getting bird photos.

On arrival, the first bird to get my attention was an Australasian Darter (Anhinga novaehollandiae). It was the way he entered the water: nothing graceful about this bird. He hit the water with a loud splash, something akin to a “belly flop” we used to do in the pool as kids.

The Australasian Darter, described in my bird identification book as a “spectacular large bird”, (86-94 cm) is very apt. It is also known as the “snake bird”  because of its long snake-like neck.

 

Australasian Darter

Australasian Darter Anhinga novaehollandiae

I spotted the  Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta) standing in a tree on what looked like a nest. The tree was filled Cormorants and their nests, however, I couldn’t see any young. Back in spring, which was my last visit to Balyang Sanctuary, there was plenty of young birds.

 

Eastern Great Egret

Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta)

One observation I did make: when it wasn’t preening it stood with its head hanging low. I don’t know the reason for this, however, I was wondering if it was some form of defence against the heat of the day. It was a hot summer’s day and the mercury was climbing high.

 

Eastern Great Egret

Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta)

I lost sight of the Eastern Great Egret, however, when I next saw it, it had flown to a nearby wetland and was on the hunt for dinner.

 

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Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta) – on the hunt

As I wanted to get a closer photo, I edged closer, but I did notice it kept an eye on me.

 

Eastern Great Egret

Eastern Great Egret (Ardea modesta)

Not far from the Eastern Great Egret I came across this Pied Cormorant (Phalacrocorax varius), panting heavily. By now it was the hottest part of the day. Again, I can only guess that this panting is a way to keep cool.

 

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Pied Cormorant Phalacrocorax varius – panting

The last photo of the day was of a Spotless Crake (Porzana tabuensis) sitting quietly in the reeds.

 

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Spotless Crake Porzana tabuensis

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My Garden Birds

The New Holland Honeyeaters (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae) are resident birds in my garden. Like many other small birds, they are very flighty and to capture their photograph can be challenging. However, this one took a break from chasing insects and sat quietly on the Bottlebrush for several minutes.

New Holland Honeyeater

This female Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) was spotted feeding in my Crab Apple Tree, and I was easily able to snap her photograph from my front veranda. She was certainly shy and disappeared into the foliage to get away from me.

Australian King Parrot

This Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus) was also spotted taking a break in one my trees.

Rainbow Lorikeet

Later in the afternoon, I noticed the Female Australian King Parrot had returned to the Crab Apple Tree, but now she was accompanied by her mate.

Australian King Parrot

Australian King Parrot

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Eucalyptus calophylla rosea

The flowering gums have been showing beautifully in Colac lately. While they are native to West Australia there are some excellent species in full flower in the Botanic Gardens. There are also some been planted by the Shire Council along some of the city streets.

These pictures are of the Eucalyptus calophylla rosea which is planted in our yard. This tree must be over thirty years old now, and every summer gives us outstanding blossoms, like these.

Eucalyptus calophylla roseaEucalyptus calophylla roseaEucalyptus calophylla rosea

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.