Pombo Mart

The Pombo Mart is an iconic building on the Princes Highway at Pomborneit between Colac and Camperdown in Victoria, Australia. The building began life as a Creamery operated by the Camperdown Cheese and Butter Factory in 1892, and was of timber construction.

The Pombo Mart on the Princes Highway at Pomborneit North, Victoria, Australia

In 1908, Bacchus Marsh Concentrated Milk Co. Ltd. purchased the Creamery and produced Lifeguard Milk. The Nestle Anglo Swiss Company acquired the building in 1917 and the company replaced the timber construction with the current iron building.

The Pombo Mart on the Princes Highway at Pomborneit North, Victoria, Australia

In 1936, the building was re-purchased by the Camperdown Cheese and Butter Factory who operated there until its closure in the mid 1950s. 

The Pombo Mart on the Princes Highway at Pomborneit North, Victoria, Australia

The Pombo Mart faces west, and the colour of the setting sun reflected on the buildings.

Footnote:

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Proudfoots Boathouse

It is described as one of the most recognisable and historic buildings in the Warrnambool region of Victoria, Australia. 

Thomas Proudfoot  had applied for a jetty licence near the mouth of the Hopkins River for the purpose of running a boating business in 1885. However, in 1900, just after the building had been completed he died suddenly. His widow, with two young children, took over the boathouse tearooms and accommodation and ran it for the next 30 years.

The Hopkins River, looking towards the mouth of the river, with Proudfoots Boathouse, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia

Warrnambool, on the Great Ocean Road, situated in south west Victoria, Australia, has a population of about 35,200. It is a popular tourist destination with the Logan Beach Whale Watching Platform on many tourist “to do” list.

Proudfoots Boat House on the Hopkins River, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia
Proudfoots Boat House, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia
Proudfoots Boat House, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia
Hopkins River, looking up stream, Warrnambool, Victoria, Australia

Footnote:

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

86 Ryrie Street – Opposite the Post Office

Now home to the real estate office of Ray White, this building, on the corner of Ryrie Street opposite the Post Office was designed by the architectural firm of Alexander Davidson and Co. It was commissioned in 1878 by local grocer, Richard Clarke.

86 Ryrie Street, Geelong, Victoria, Australia

It was built in 1880, on the south-west corner of Ryrie and Gheringhap Streets, which was the former site of Clement Nash’s monumental mason’s yard.

The local newspaper, the Geelong Advertiser, described the premises as an “imposing structure”. 

“The building, which is to be erected after the Byzantine style of architecture, is to be of brick on bluestone foundations, the outside to be cemented, and there will be pressed cement enrichments in the cornices and string cause. The front of the store is to have an ornamental cement parapet, and there will be two mansards in the roof fronting Ryrie-street.”

86 Ryrie Street, Geelong, Victoria, Australia

From here, Richard Clarke, who had arrived in Victoria from England in 1851, conducted his wholesale and retail business. He sold groceries, wines and spirits, not just in Geelong, but in the surrounding country districts. Business began at the new store in early 1879.

Source: Trove: The book of Geelong its people, places, industries and amusements

https://nla.gov.au:443/tarkine/nla.obj-737421252

About Corayo: A Thematic History of Greater Geelong

https/www.geelongaustralia.com.au/common/Public/Documents/8d97c1c5405a0b1-thematic5sep20218lr

Footnote:

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Prickly Paperbark Tree

The Prickly Paperbark Tree (Melaleuca styphelioides) is a small to medium size tree native to eastern Australia. The following photographs are of the flowers of the Prickly Paperbark Tree I have growing in my backyard.

Prickly Paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides) Victoria, Australia
Prickly Paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides) Victoria, Australia
Prickly Paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides) Victoria, Australia

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Backyard Honeyeaters

About mid-morning most days, the bird bath becomes a popular spot with the small birds. Most are quite small, but all have one thing in common: they are extremely quick.

White-naped Honeyeater (Melithreptus lunatus) settles here before taking a bath.
White-naped Honeyeater (Melithreptus lunatus) sits on the rim of the bird bath.
White-naped Honeyeaters (Melithreptus lunatus)

The following photo is of a White-plumed Honeyeater which is a first on my backyard birding list. I have seen these birds in other places, but I’m pleased to see it in my backyard.

White-plumed Honeyeater (Ptilotula penicillata)
Yellow-faced Honeyeater (Lichenostomus chrysops)

Footnote:

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Bird’s-nest Fern

The Bird’s-nest Fern (Asplenium nidus) was displaying beautifully on this sunny autumn morning.

Bird’s-nest Fern (Asplenium nidus) at the Botanic Gardens in Colac, Victoria, Australia

Footnote:

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Flowers of the Lilly Pilly

My Lilly Pilly (Syzygium smithii) tree has burst into flower. The cream-white flowers appear in panicles at the end of branches.

Common Lilly Pilly (Syzygium smithii)
Common Lilly Pilly (Syzygium smithii)

The above photo, shows the glossy dark-green leaves of the Common Lilly Pilly. New growth has a reddish tinge. As Australia moves from summer into the cooler months the flowers will be replaced by red berries.

Common Lilly Pilly (Syzygium smithii)
Common Lilly Pilly (Syzygium smithii)

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

88 Ryrie Street, Geelong

In 1900, William Leggo, began his association with the store at 88 Ryrie Street, Geelong.

This site had previously been owned by Thomas Barber Hunt whom, it appears, to have established the Australian Produce stores from this location before 1874. In 1911, William Leggo purchased the property from Thomas Hunt’s Estate.

In 1922, in anticipation of admitting his son James to entering a partnership with him, William Leggo engaged Geelong architects Laird and Buchan. They designed a new two storey brick shop with the name of the family business, W. Leggo & Son, Grocers, emblazoned on the building’s parapets.

Ironically, Leggo never operated his grocery from his new building. The business was sold to Robert Dawson and Arthur Skirrow. Leggo retained ownership of the building and it became widely known as Leggo’s Building.

W. Leggo & Son Grocers Building, Ryrie Street, Geelong, Victoria, Australia

Source: About Corayo: A Thematic History of Greater Geelong

https/www.geelongaustralia.com.au/common/Public/Documents/8d97c1c5405a0b1-thematic5sep20218lr

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Petals for Valentine’s Day

Be like the male Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) on Saint Valentine’s Day.

When looking for a suitable mate, he carries a flower petal around to impress any prospective suitor. His favourite colour is yellow.

Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) with his yellow petal.
Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) with his yellow petal.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

© Fred O’Donnell Photography

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.

Bottlebrush Kunzea

The Bottlebrush Kunzea (Kunzea baxteri) or Crimson Bottlebrush, a member of the Myrtaceae family, is native to the south-west of Western Australia. Like many other popular native plants, they made their way into Australian gardens on the East coast through specialist native nurseries which became popular from the 1970s.

These specimens pictured below, were growing at the entrance to the platform at the Colac Railway Station.

Bottlebrush Kunzea (Kunzea baxteri), Railway Station, Colac, Victoria
Bottlebrush Kunzea (Kunzea baxteri), Railway Station, Colac, Victoria
Bottlebrush Kunzea, (Kunzea baxteri), Railway Station, Colac, Victoria

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. Please respect my copyright.

Acknowledgements

I respect and acknowledge the Gulidjan people as the First Peoples and Traditional custodians of the land and waterways on which I live.

I acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.