Road Trip – Days 1 – 3

Our road trip was planned. My wife and I hired a motor-home and we were going to use it to drive to Yeppoon on the central Queensland coast; a return journey of over four thousand kilometres with four weeks to complete our journey.

Like most plans, things can sometimes go awry. Due to a family emergency, day one found us still at home and day two was spent driving for two hours to pick up the motor home, then, what seemed like almost as much time finalizing the paperwork. So, it was late in the afternoon of day two we headed north along the Hume Freeway to start our road trip.

Day 3:

After our first night in the motor home we woke on Sunday morning to a cold frosty winter’s day. At least we had bright sunshine and beautiful blue skies.

Our motor home at Wangaratta North.

Still heading north along the Hume Freeway, we soon turned off to visit the historic gold town of Chiltern.

The Main Street of Chiltern

Chiltern is very proud of its heritage and the buildings, most built in the 19th century, are beautifully maintained. In some ways, walking around this little town was like stepping back in time. The local people were friendly and strangers in the street would smile and say, “G’day”.

Masonic Hall

The Court House – built in 1865

Side view of the Court House

Federal Standard Newspaper Office – built in 1860

Bank of Australasia – now a Tea House with fine food and hand crafts

My wife and I visited the Old Chiltern Bank Tea House (28 Conness Street, Chiltern, Victoria 3683). We were tempted to try the delicious looking cakes but resisted and just had coffee.

The new owner greeted us in a friendly manner and made us welcome. We pledged to return one day for an extended stay and both of us agreed this beautiful old bank would be the perfect place to stay as the bank residence is currently being renovated and soon to be used for accommodation.

The Old Chiltern Bank Tea House can  be contacted here:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/TheOldChilternBank/about/

Chiltern Vet Clinic

The above photo, now the local vet’s office, has signs that give clues to this building’s former existence – “Kodak supplies” and “Enlargements”.

 

Star Hotel – at the height of the gold rush, Chiltern had 12 hotels

The original Blacksmith Building


Doorway to the Old Blacksmith Building

Athenaeum Museum Annex

Many of the well preserved buildings of Chiltern are registered with the National Trust. So if driving the Hume Freeway in Victoria, I would highly recommend taking a short detour and visiting this historic town.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

The above photos were all taken using an iPhone 7 Plus.

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Pin-cushion Hakea

The Pin-cushion Hakea (Hakea laurina) is a superb Australia Native Plant endemic to South-west Australia, however is grown widely throughout Australia and overseas.

The following photographs are of the flower of this small tree.

Pin-cushion Hakea

Pin-cushion Hakea

Meaning of the name: Hakea laurina

Hakea: after the 20th century botanist Baron von Hake.

laurina: because of the laurel like leaves.

Pin-cushion Hakea

Pin-cushion HakeaPin-cushion Hakea

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Superb Fairy-wren

The male Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) has been labelled as the “least faithful bird in the world”. The female may be courted by up to 13 males in a half hour period.

The Superb Fairy-wren is a small Australian Native bird (13 – 14 cms) and about 10 grams in weight. They are found south of the Tropic of Capricorn in eastern Australia.

Female Superb Fairy-wren

Superb Fairy-wren

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Nature

“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,

There is a rapture on the lonely shore,

There is society, where none intrudes,

By the deep sea, and music in its roar:

I love not Man the less, but Nature more,

From these our interviews, in which I steal

From all I may be, or have been before,

To mingle with the universe, and feel

What I can ne’er express, yet cannot all conceal.”

(George Gordon) Lord Byron

Sky Gazing – Cirrus clouds over Lake Corangamite

Sky, Lake Corangamite

Seed Heads – Backlit and glowing in the late afternoon sun

Seed Head

Windmill at Sunset, near Lake Corangamite

Windmill

A Seat for Contemplation at Lake Colac

Lake Colac

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Prickly Paperbark

The following photos are of an Australian Native Plant the Prickly Paperbark (Melaleuca styphelioides), which I planted in my front yard many years ago. This summer they were in full bloom giving me the best display I’ve ever seen from them.

Prickly Paperbark

Paperbarks got their name because the bark of these trees look like paper. Early settlers used the bark to light campfires when making tea. This gave them their nickname, “Tea Tree”.

Prickly Paperbark

With over 200 species of Melaleuca in Australia, only a few are trees. It is endemic to Australia, with Melaleuca forests, mainly in northern regions, covering some 6.5 million hectares.

These forests are important habitat for many birds such as egrets, herons, and spoonbills. Oils, e.g. Tea Tree Oil, come from the foliage of some species of Melaleuca.

Melaleuca derives from the Greek, melas (black) and leukos (white).

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Eucalyptus Flowers

The following photographs are of Eucalyptus  flowers of the Tuart tree (Eucalyptus gomphocephala). It is an Australian native plant and is endemic to Western Australia.

Eucalyptus Flower

Eucalyptus Flower

Eucalyptus Flower

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

April Photos

The year is going so fast! Already it is May.

The following photos are just a few from the month of April.

1 – Spotted Dove (Streptopelia chinensis)

Spotted Dove

Spotted Doves (aka Turtle Doves) were introduced to Australia and they have thrived in our cities. This photo was taken an urban Melbourne backyard.

2 – White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae)

White-faced Heron

I kept meeting this particular wader as it fed in the creek where I took my daily walk. White-faced Herons are a common Australian native bird which has also adapted to living in urban areas.

3 – Yellow-faced Honeyeater (Lichenostomus chrysops)

Yellow-faced Honeyeater

I snapped this bird in my backyard. I saw it sitting there preening, and was able to get close. It is just one of the many different varieties of honeyeaters that call my home, home.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.