Williamstown Gardens

The following photographs were taken yesterday on a short visit to the Williamstown Botanical Gardens. The official start to Spring is still a few days away, however, if one kept out of the chilly breeze, one would think it had started a little early.

Flowers, Botanic Gardens, Williamstown, Victoria, Australia

By chance, the entry I used had me walking towards the sun. A lot of what I saw was backlit; not a bad thing.

A Handsome Bird

While not as colourful as other birds that visit my backyard, the Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica) is still a handsome bird, in my opinion.

Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)
Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)
Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)

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Breeding Season

As we approach spring here, in Australia, breeding season is about to start for many of our birds. Recently, on a visit to the Botanic Gardens at Williamstown, I photographed a pair of Long-billed Corellas which had made their nest in the hollow of a Palm Tree.

Usually, these birds would find a hollow in a large Eucalypt. Long-billed Corellas breed from August until December and will lay two to four eggs.

Long-billed Corellas (Cacatua tenuirostris)

Galahs become mates for life and form permanent pairs. Easily identified by her red irises, the female will lay 2 – 4 eggs.

Breeding season for Galahs, in the south of Australia, is July to December.

A mated pair of Galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus)
A female Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

In this photograph, the female bird has a dirty face, which she would have gotten from working on her nesting hollow.

Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosellas (Platycercus elegans) breed from September to January. They nest in tree hollows high in tall Eucalypts, laying four to eight eggs.

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Hide and Seek

This male Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) played a game of hide and seek with me. As I sat on my front verandah, he kept his eyes firmly on me. Then, for just a split second, he came into clear sight, framed by the foliage he was using to hide behind.

Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

The male Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis) is the only Australian parrot with a redhead.

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Another Close Encounter

In a previous post, I wrote and shared photos, of how I was able to get up close to a Sulphur-crested Cockatoo. A couple of days ago, I had the same experience with an Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis).

Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

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Galahs in the Garden

The following photographs are the result of a quick walk around my yard, camera in hand.

The Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus) is an endemic species of Cockatoo recorded only in Australia. It is coloured grey and pink. There are three races: Race roseicapillus; Race albiceps; Race kuhli.

A mated pair of Galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus) share a moment
Female Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

A female Galah is easily identified by her red irises.
Judging by the dirty face of this female, it appears she has been busy in the tree hollow tending to her motherly duties. Breeding season for Galahs, in the south of Australia, is July to December. She will lay 2 – 4 eggs.

Forming permanent pairs, Galahs become mates for life. Their young will have duller colours with grey about the face and breast.

Another female Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

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Last Roll

Recently I loaded my last roll of Kodacolor 200 film into my Kodak Retinette 11 rangefinder camera. This roll of film was well and truly past its use-by date. However, I had shot other rolls of this film from this batch with no problems.

Wall Art, Hosier Lane, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Laneway, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

The next two photographs were not the result I was expecting.

Laneway, Hosier Lane, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Though grainy I am not unhappy with the results.

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Nature at Agnes Water

Recently I spent a few days at Agnes Water in Central Queensland. Agnes Water is a coastal town just south of the Tropic of Capricorn, so it is an ideal place to escape the harsh winter of my part of Australia.

The following photos are just a few of the species I encountered in the natural world of Agnes Water.

 

P8127017-Goanna.jpg

Australian Monitor Lizard – commonly known as a Goanna

Our holiday accommodation faced east, and was high up on a hill, so watching the sunrise each morning was a delight.

 

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Sunrise at Agnes Water

This Australasian Figbird (Sphecotheres vieilloti) was enjoying her breakfast in a nearby, well, fig tree.

 

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Australasian Figbird
Sphecotheres vieilloti

As I stood on the veranda, waiting to see which birds would appear, my attention was drawn to this Brown House Spider (Steatoda sp) backlit by the early morning sun.

 

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Brown House Spider
Steatoda sp

 

 

When I saw this Grevillea in a local park, I knew it would not be long before one of the many Blue-faced Honeyeaters (Entomyzon cyanotis) appeared.

 

P8137047-Grevillea.jpg

Grevillea

 

 

Blue-faced Honeyeater

Blue-faced Honeyeater 
Entomyzon cyanotis

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I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

Nature Walk

The following photos were taken over the past few days when I included the Botanic Gardens in my nature walk.

 

Oleander-leaved Protea

Oleander-leaved Protea
(Protea neriifolia)
White Form

 

Oleander-leaved Protea

Oleander-leaved Protea (Protea neriifolia) White Form

Bottle Brush Kunzea

Bottle Brush Kunzea
(Kunzea baxteri)

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Bottle Brush Kunzea
(Kunzea baxteri)

P8016912-River Wattle.jpg

River Wattle
(Acacia cognata)
Lime Magic, Mimosaceae

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

Camellia

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Backyard Birds

Of all the birds that visit my backyard, the Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans) would outnumber them all. During our recent bouts of bad weather, I have kept myself amused by pointing my lens towards these birds as they came to feed. It was a good opportunity to highlight the birds in their different plumages at different stages of immaturity.

Crimson Rosella

Adult Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Adult Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

In the above photo, this Juvenile/Immature Crimson Rosella was intent on protecting his place in the queue to gain access to the feeding bowl.

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

This pair of birds at the feeding bowl are almost, but not quite, at the same stage of immaturity.

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Immature Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

The above Crimson Rosella is almost at full adult plumage.

Crimson Rosella

Adult Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.