Dee Cottage

The following photographs are of Dee Cottage, built in 1880, in the industrial suburb of Melbourne called Yarraville. It is considered of historical and architectural significance.

Dee Cottage

On their website, the Heritage Council Victoria, state:

Statement of Significance

Dee cottage is of historical and architectural significance to the City of Maribyrnong as a relatively intact early residence, used as a company house by the nearby Cuming Smith & Co. works and built in association with major industrial development and closely related historically to the local industries which gave it its purpose. (Criteria B2 & D2) Distinctive architectural form of the period also relatively intact and well preserved. (Criterion F1) The site has significant historical associations as a former residence of James Cuming, founder and principal of Cuming Smith fertiliser works and one of Footscray’s most prominent citizens. (Criterion H1)

Australian Heritage Commission (AHC) criteria

The Australian Heritage Commission criteria consist of a set of eight criteria which cover social, aesthetic, scientific, and historic values. Each criterion has sub-criteria written specifically for cultural or natural values. The relevant criteria are:

B.2 rarity

D.2 good example of type

H.1 association with important person or group

F.1 design or technological achievement

Here is the link: http://vhd.heritagecouncil.vic.gov.au/places/28788

Dee Cottage

Dee Cottage

These photos were shot with my Nikon EM film camera using Kodak colour film.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

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Harbour Board Building

The Harbour Board Building is a Heritage Listed building in Quay Street, Rockhampton. Also known as the Fitzroy Shire Council Chambers, it was built in 1898 by Renshaw and Ricketts.

Quay Street, Rockhampton, is well known for its Heritage Buildings.

 

IMG_0851.jpg

The Heritage listed Harbour Board Building 

 

The above photo was taken using my iPhone.

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Shooting with Film.

As I begin this post, 2018 looms large. A new year demands new and fresh ideas, but my new idea is actually an old one. I’m about to re-start using film.

It’s not a spur of the moment decision as I have been thinking of doing this for some time now. I found my old film camera, a Nikon EM, and the three rolls of Kodacolor (ISO 200), and two rolls of Kodak black and white (C41 processing) film I knew were put away in a cupboard when I turned to digital photography. That was back in 2006. The film has expired, but having been stored in a dark cool place, I’m sure it will be alright.

I remember some years ago, I was in a supermarket, and as I went through the check-out, on the counter, there was a small basket full of expired (just) Kodachrome film at a price too good to pass up. I bought the lot!

A couple of weeks later I was on holiday with my family. I shot every frame of those rolls of expired film, and there were no failures.

What do I expect to achieve by shooting film? Buying film, then having it processed, has never been cheap. And I think that is the way of it now. With digital, it is so easy to keep pushing the shutter, returning home with a dozen or more frames of the same subject, and selecting the best one. As I said, film is too expensive to do that!

I hope, by shooting film, it will make think more about the shot I am about to take and more about what I will achieve once I have pushed the shutter button.

Also, I must confess, I like the look and the colours of film once it has been printed.

I intend using Kodak film whenever I can. I have a loyalty to Kodak that goes back many years – my first full-time job was at Kodak.

My last major photo shoot using film was in 2005. That year my wife and I went overseas to Europe. We flew from Australia to London via Dubai, to London, then on to Dublin. In Dublin, we hired a car then drove around the north of Ireland to Galway. From there we drove across Ireland to Wexford, then catching the ferry to Fishguard in Wales.

We drove across Wales into England and spent a few days in London. From London, we caught the train to Paris where we spent a few pleasant days before returning to Australia.

Photo 1: Old City Gates, Drogheda, Ireland 

Scan 18

Photo 2: Lough Neagh, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Lough Neagh

Photo 3: Mute Swan, Lough Neagh, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Mute Swan

Photo 4: Mute Swans, Lough Neagh, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Mute Swan

All of the above photos were shot using my Nikon EM camera loaded with Kodacolor film.

I would be interested to hear your thoughts about shooting with film. Do you (or have you ever) use film? What is your favourite brand of film?

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Flinders Street

The following photograph was made on my iPhone. Last winter after attending a Adobe Creative Cloud information day, I was standing at the intersection of Flinders Street and Swanston Street, which would be Melbourne’s busiest intersection.

The light was brilliant on a sunny winter’s day and I was lamenting not having my camera with me. I rarely use my phone for this type of image but the it was the only camera I had.

Flinders Street - taken on the iPhone and processed in Snapseed.

Flinders Street – taken on the iPhone and processed in Snapseed.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

The New Pier, Lorne

In 2007 the new pier at Lorne was opened, and I have heard it is a big hit with fishermen who gather at the end of it with their rods. The end has been designed with platforms where fisherman can dangle their lines and are clear of the pedestrians and sightseers. It is built of concrete and steel, and, in my opinion lacks soul.

The old one, which was over a hundred years old, was built from large timber poles and planks. It had character; like a wizened weather beaten old man with a face full of creases who keeps you enthralled with stories from times past. As I walked over the large planks with cracks that allowed me to see through to the waves below, I could feel the history this ancient structure exuded.

The New Pier at Lorne

The New Pier at Lorne

Exhibition Building

Following on from my post yesterday, I would like to tell you about the the Royal Exhibition Building where the Melbourne International Flower and Garden show was held recently.

The Royal Exhibition Building is one of the oldest remaining exhibition buildings in the world. Construction was completed in 1880 just in time for the Melbourne International Exhibition in 1880-1881. It also hosted the first Parliament of Australia in 1901. It was awarded UNESCO World Heritage status in 2004; the first Australian building to  be awarded.

The Royal Exhibition Building

The Royal Exhibition Building

The Royal Exhibition Building #2

The Royal Exhibition Building #2

Exhibition Building

The Dome of the Royal Exhibition Building

The architect, Joseph Reed, modeled the dome on the Florence Cathedral.

Fountain

The Fountain

Exhibition Building

The Great Hall – It is here that the exhibitions are held.

It is in the GreatHall that the exhibitions are held. On this occasion it was the Floral Art Show which is part of the International Flower and Garden Show.

Exhibition Building

One of the magnificent lights hanging from the ceiling.

The Old Swing Bridge

The Old Swing Bridge is situated on the Erskine River at Lorne on the Great Ocean Road on the south west coast of Victoria, Australia. Constructed in 1937 it has become a famous landmark and tourist attraction. Also at this point there is a grave which holds the bodies of two young children who, in 1850, were suffocated in a tunnel they had dug into the sandy bank of the river.

The Old Swing Bridge at the mouth of the Erskine River

The Old Swing Bridge at the mouth of the Erskine River

The Old Swing Bridge

The Old Swing Bridge
The Old Swing Bridge crosses the Erskine River at Lorne on the Great Ocean Road on the south west coast of Victoria, Australia.