Shooting with Film.

As I begin this post, 2018 looms large. A new year demands new and fresh ideas, but my new idea is actually an old one. I’m about to re-start using film.

It’s not a spur of the moment decision as I have been thinking of doing this for some time now. I found my old film camera, a Nikon EM, and the three rolls of Kodacolor (ISO 200), and two rolls of Kodak black and white (C41 processing) film I knew were put away in a cupboard when I turned to digital photography. That was back in 2006. The film has expired, but having been stored in a dark cool place, I’m sure it will be alright.

I remember some years ago, I was in a supermarket, and as I went through the check-out, on the counter, there was a small basket full of expired (just) Kodachrome film at a price too good to pass up. I bought the lot!

A couple of weeks later I was on holiday with my family. I shot every frame of those rolls of expired film, and there were no failures.

What do I expect to achieve by shooting film? Buying film, then having it processed, has never been cheap. And I think that is the way of it now. With digital, it is so easy to keep pushing the shutter, returning home with a dozen or more frames of the same subject, and selecting the best one. As I said, film is too expensive to do that!

I hope, by shooting film, it will make think more about the shot I am about to take and more about what I will achieve once I have pushed the shutter button.

Also, I must confess, I like the look and the colours of film once it has been printed.

I intend using Kodak film whenever I can. I have a loyalty to Kodak that goes back many years – my first full-time job was at Kodak.

My last major photo shoot using film was in 2005. That year my wife and I went overseas to Europe. We flew from Australia to London via Dubai, to London, then on to Dublin. In Dublin, we hired a car then drove around the north of Ireland to Galway. From there we drove across Ireland to Wexford, then catching the ferry to Fishguard in Wales.

We drove across Wales into England and spent a few days in London. From London, we caught the train to Paris where we spent a few pleasant days before returning to Australia.

Photo 1: Old City Gates, Drogheda, Ireland 

Scan 18

Photo 2: Lough Neagh, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Lough Neagh

Photo 3: Mute Swan, Lough Neagh, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Mute Swan

Photo 4: Mute Swans, Lough Neagh, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Mute Swan

All of the above photos were shot using my Nikon EM camera loaded with Kodacolor film.

I would be interested to hear your thoughts about shooting with film. Do you (or have you ever) use film? What is your favourite brand of film?

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

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Flinders Street

The following photograph was made on my iPhone. Last winter after attending a Adobe Creative Cloud information day, I was standing at the intersection of Flinders Street and Swanston Street, which would be Melbourne’s busiest intersection.

The light was brilliant on a sunny winter’s day and I was lamenting not having my camera with me. I rarely use my phone for this type of image but the it was the only camera I had.

Flinders Street - taken on the iPhone and processed in Snapseed.

Flinders Street – taken on the iPhone and processed in Snapseed.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

The New Pier, Lorne

In 2007 the new pier at Lorne was opened, and I have heard it is a big hit with fishermen who gather at the end of it with their rods. The end has been designed with platforms where fisherman can dangle their lines and are clear of the pedestrians and sightseers. It is built of concrete and steel, and, in my opinion lacks soul.

The old one, which was over a hundred years old, was built from large timber poles and planks. It had character; like a wizened weather beaten old man with a face full of creases who keeps you enthralled with stories from times past. As I walked over the large planks with cracks that allowed me to see through to the waves below, I could feel the history this ancient structure exuded.

The New Pier at Lorne

The New Pier at Lorne

Exhibition Building

Following on from my post yesterday, I would like to tell you about the the Royal Exhibition Building where the Melbourne International Flower and Garden show was held recently.

The Royal Exhibition Building is one of the oldest remaining exhibition buildings in the world. Construction was completed in 1880 just in time for the Melbourne International Exhibition in 1880-1881. It also hosted the first Parliament of Australia in 1901. It was awarded UNESCO World Heritage status in 2004; the first Australian building to  be awarded.

The Royal Exhibition Building

The Royal Exhibition Building

The Royal Exhibition Building #2

The Royal Exhibition Building #2

Exhibition Building

The Dome of the Royal Exhibition Building

The architect, Joseph Reed, modeled the dome on the Florence Cathedral.

Fountain

The Fountain

Exhibition Building

The Great Hall – It is here that the exhibitions are held.

It is in the GreatHall that the exhibitions are held. On this occasion it was the Floral Art Show which is part of the International Flower and Garden Show.

Exhibition Building

One of the magnificent lights hanging from the ceiling.

The Old Swing Bridge

The Old Swing Bridge is situated on the Erskine River at Lorne on the Great Ocean Road on the south west coast of Victoria, Australia. Constructed in 1937 it has become a famous landmark and tourist attraction. Also at this point there is a grave which holds the bodies of two young children who, in 1850, were suffocated in a tunnel they had dug into the sandy bank of the river.

The Old Swing Bridge at the mouth of the Erskine River

The Old Swing Bridge at the mouth of the Erskine River

The Old Swing Bridge

The Old Swing Bridge
The Old Swing Bridge crosses the Erskine River at Lorne on the Great Ocean Road on the south west coast of Victoria, Australia.

Early Morning

This morning was an early start. I headed off to Lorne situated on the Great Ocean Road on the south west coast of Victoria in Australia. After a quick breakfast (black coffee and an egg and bacon roll) at the local bakery it was down to business setting up the tripod and camera.

The images below are the best from my first shots. There are others that I am in the process of developing to follow in future posts.

Jetty at Lorne - First light

Jetty at Lorne – First light

The jetty at Lorne - first light

The jetty at Lorne #2

Winter

Over the past few months I have been looking at the work of photographers who live in the northern hemisphere and the images they have posted on-line of their autumn (fall). And I must admit I have been a little envious of their very colourful autumn pictures.

I have read how our early ancestors, having arrived in this strange far off land, bemoaned the fact that Australia does not really have seasons (as they did in Europe). Our trees do not change colour in autumn; they keep their leaves in winter! To fix this problem, many English Elm trees were planted in the streets of our towns. Parks were also planted with these English trees. Today many of these trees would be about 100 years old or more. They are battling old age and disease. They are the only trees to change colour in autumn and winter.

The following images were taken several years ago in a small town not far from where I live. They were taken on a cold but sunny winter’s day. They are about as close as I can get to simulating a northern hemisphere autumn.

PS: I must admit it is a bit hard to do a post like this today. We are definitely not cold here – we are expecting a top temperature of around 40 degrees celsius. Believe me it is very hot here!!

Street Scene, Camperdown

Street Scene, Camperdown

Street Scene

Street Scene #2, Camperdown – The streets are lined with English Elms planted by our ancestors

Street Scene

The historic Clock Tower with the Elm Tree-lined park