Superb Fairy-wren

The female Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) may not be as vividly coloured as her male counterpart, but she is still a beautiful little bird. I have identified three males and three female, with possibly one juvenile, living in my back garden.

While I have managed to take some photos of the males, the female has eluded me. However, in the past couple of weeks, I have managed to get a few photographs.

Superb Fairy-wren

Here, she is being escorted by two of the males. These birds are small (11-14 cm.) and very fast. I barely had the chance to get the camera to my eye, press the shutter, then they were off!

Superb Fairy-wren

Superb Fairy-wren

Superb Fairy-wren

Female Superb Fairy-wrens are brown, with a reddish-brown bill, lores.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

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My Garden Birds

For a while there, it was looking like January was going to be the month of the Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita). However, judging by the quietness of the neighbourhood lately, it seems they must have moved on to new hunting grounds.

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita)

Crimson Rosellas (Platycercus elegans)Galahs (Eolophus roseicapillus) are all frequent visitors to the feeders in my garden. Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) occasionally turn up, and then have the cheek to try and take over.

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Galah

Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

Galah

Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

Galah

Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

Rainbow Lorikeet

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus)

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

2017 -The First Month

Almost in the blink of an eye, January, 2017, has been and gone. These are the photos of the birds I managed to take this month walking around my yard.

1 – Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

Superb Fairy-wren

This Superb fairy-wren has been resident in my garden for a few years now. In this photo he is showing his full breeding colours.

2 – Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita)

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Every summer a small flock of Sulphur-crested Cockatoos turn up at my place. They hang around for a few weeks then just turn up occasionally.

3 – New Holland Honeyeater (Phylidonyris novaehollandiae)

New Holland Honeyeater

Another resident in my garden. This little honeyeater flits from bush to bush feeding voraciously on the Banksia and Bottlebrushes and other Australian native plants in my garden

4 – Yellow-faced Honeyeater (Lichenostomus chrysops)

Yellow-faced Honeyeater

Another resident Honeyeater, but also hunts for insects around the house.

5 – Grey Fantail (Rhipidura albiscapa)

Grey Fantail

The Grey Fantail also hunts for little insects around the house.

6 – Galah (Eolophus roseicapillus)

Galah

My post would be incomplete without a photo of the galahs that visit my garden. This pair had become aware of me stalking them and desperately tried to hide among the leaves.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Ending 2016

2016 is fast coming to an end. For my last post of 2016, I’ve decided to share the photographs of the birds that visit my garden.

No1 – Grey Shrike-thrush (Colluricincla harmonica)

Grey Shrike-thrush

This Grey Shrike-thrush was captured patrolling my backyard where he hunted every morning for breakfast.

No2 – Superb Fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus)

Superb Fairy-wren

This Superb Fairy-wren turned up in the garden some 4 or 5 years ago. Since then, every breeding season, there are little ones flying around hunting insects.

No3 – Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosellas would be the most prolific bird in the garden. At feed time tens of these birds turn up.

No4 – Australian King Parrot (Alisterus scapularis)

Australian King Parrot

Australian King Parrots are infrequent visitors to my garden. They will appear at the feeder, even tell me when it is empty, then disappear for a few weeks before turning up again. Of all the wild birds that fly in, the King Parrot is the only one which will let me approach it.

There are many other species of birds that I will find in the trees in my yard. These are but a few of them.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper

The Sharp-tailed Sandpiper  (Calidris acuminata) is a medium sized wader found in inland waters and coastal areas of Australia. A strongly migratory bird it arrives in Australia in August and returns to Arctic Siberia in March where its breeding habitat is the peat-hummock and lichen tundra of the high Arctic.

It feeds on aquatic insects and their larvae, as well as worms, molluscs and crustaceans.

The image below was taken in early summer on the foreshore of Lake Colac.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper on the shoreline of Lake Colac.

Sharp-tailed Sandpiper on the shoreline of Lake Colac.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Tree in Fog

Yesterday morning I went for a walk along the southern shore of Lake Colac. On arrival there was a thick fog which blanketed out the lake. I took several photographs and this one is my favourite.

English Elm on the southern bank of Lake Colac

English Elm on the southern bank of Lake Colac

Please Note: All images appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Other Feathered Friends

Staying with the theme of my last post, here are some more photos of birds in my garden.

King Parrot, Alisterus scapularis, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

King Parrot – Alisterus scapularis

Australian Magpie, Gymnorhina tibicen, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Australian Magpie – Gymnorhina tibicen

Gang-Gang Cockatoo, Callocephalon fimbriatum, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Gang-Gang Cockatoo – Callocephalon fimbriatum

Pink Galah, Eolophus Roseicapilla, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Pink Galah – Eolophus roseicapilla