Birds of Lake Colac

Yesterday morning I went to Lake Colac to check out the bird life. Normally this lake has a good healthy population of water birds, however, after a long hot dry summer the water level is receding fast. The number of birds also appears to be dropping.

The first image is of a colony of Australian Pelicans (Pelecanus conspicillatus). Here they were clumping in a bid to protect each other from the very strong westerly wind.

Clumping pelicans

Clumping pelicans

Near the point where I stood is the mouth of Barongarook Creek. This creek has a nice little of colony of ducks of various species.

Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa) at home in Barongarook Creek

Pacific Black Duck (Anas superciliosa) at home in Barongarook Creek

Blue-billed Duck (Oxyura australis) with another unidentified bird

Blue-billed Duck (Oxyura australis) with another unidentified bird

These ducks soon lost interest when the discovered I was not there to feed them!

These ducks soon lost interest when they discovered I was not there to feed them!

I will not turn around!

I will not turn around!

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Immature Crimson Rosellas

The following photographs are of immature Crimson Rosellas (Platycercus elegans) visiting feeders I have in my garden.

They are about 30 centre metres in size and feed on seeds from grasses and eucalypts, as well as insects and tree blossoms. They are easily attracted to suburban gardens simply by putting in seed feeders and fresh water. Usually they gather in small flocks and prefer wet forests with tall eucalypts. They also like parks and gardens.

Crimson Rosella

An immature Crimson Rosella – Keeping an eye on activities at the feeder

Immature Crimson Rosella #2

Immature Crimson Rosella #2

Crimson Rosella #3

Immature Crimson Rosella #3

Crimson Rosella #4

Immature Crimson Rosella #4 – Waiting to take his place at the seed feeder

Blood Lily

The following image is of a Blood Lily, Haemanthus, which was taken at the Melbourne 2013 International Flower and Garden Show a few weeks ago.

Blood Lily (Haemanthus) taken at the Melbourne, International Flower and Garden Show

Blood Lily (Haemanthus) taken at the Melbourne International Flower and Garden Show

It is a native flower of South Africa and is also known as the Pin Cushion flower, Cape Lily or Fire-ball Lily. It is easy to see why!

The New Pier, Lorne

In 2007 the new pier at Lorne was opened, and I have heard it is a big hit with fishermen who gather at the end of it with their rods. The end has been designed with platforms where fisherman can dangle their lines and are clear of the pedestrians and sightseers. It is built of concrete and steel, and, in my opinion lacks soul.

The old one, which was over a hundred years old, was built from large timber poles and planks. It had character; like a wizened weather beaten old man with a face full of creases who keeps you enthralled with stories from times past. As I walked over the large planks with cracks that allowed me to see through to the waves below, I could feel the history this ancient structure exuded.

The New Pier at Lorne

The New Pier at Lorne