Birds of February

The following photos are just some of the birds I encountered during the month of February. Fittingly, the very first bird I snapped on the first day of February was a Superb Fairy-wren. This female has raised several families over the past four or five years in my garden. (My very first photo of 2017 was her mate. The second is of her daughter. They were out together feeding on insects.)

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Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Dahlias in the Gardens

The following photos were taken during a recent walk through the Colac Botanic Gardens.

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Bird Portraits

The following photographs were taken over the past couple of weeks.

1 – Red Wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata)

Red Wattlebird

This is a juvenile Red Wattlebird which was being fed by its parents, but, after the adult birds flew off to hide in the foliage of the trees, it remained to pose for me.

2 – Common Bronzewing (Phaps chalcoptera)

Common Bronzewing

After feeding on the ground, this female Common Bronzewing flew into a tree near my house. It sat motionless for what seemed like an eternity. It actually gave me time to go into the house and get my camera. Light conditions were very poor and to ensure I got the shot I increased the ISO setting to 800.

3 – Little Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera)

Little Wattlebird

At 27 to 35 centimetres in size, the Little Wattlebird is smaller than the Red Wattlebird, and is easily identified as it has no wattles.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

For St. Valentine’s Day

Yesterday I was going through my photo library and found some photographs which I thought were suitable for Valentine’s Day.

1 – Affectionate Galahs

Galah

Galah

2 – Courting Superb Fairy-wrens

Superb Fairy-wren

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Magnolia grandiflora

One of my favourite flowers is the Magnolia grandiflora, or Southern Magnolia. This tree, a member of the family Magnoliaceae, is native to the southeastern United States.

This photograph was taken a couple of days ago at the Colac Botanic Gardens.

Southern Magnolia

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Birding at Jawbone Reserve

The other day I made my first visit for 2017 to Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve. I find this Reserve a good spot for birding – especially waterbirds.

On entering the Reserve, my first sighting was the juvenile Black Swans (Cygnus atratus) sleeping in the reeds. There was a strong cool breeze blowing and the reeds gave them protection.

Black Swan

Black Swan

Most of the birds were inactive, the Pied Cormorants (Phalacrocorax varius) were busy preening while others were content to look on.

Pied Cormorant

Pied Cormorant

Pied Cormorant

If travelling to Melbourne I can highly recommend a visit to Jawbone Flora and Fauna Reserve.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Dingy Swallowtail

The following photograph is of a Dingy Swallowtail (Papilio anactus) I snapped a few days ago at the Williamstown Botanic Gardens.

Dingy Swallowtail

The Dingy Swallowtail is also known as the Dainty Swallowtail and the Small Citrus Butterfly. The male has a wing span of 67mm, while the female has a span of 72mm. The female has a larger abdominal size.

Dingy Swallowtails are active from November through to April. It is native to Australia.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.