A Crimson Rosella in the Melaleuca

Every afternoon, I have noticed this Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans) sitting quietly in my Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris) tree. Sometimes it is alone; sometimes with friends. It is dining out on the seeds left behind now the flowers have all died.

The Bracelet Honey Myrtle is native to south-east Australia and flowers in summer.

 

Crimson Rosella

Crimson Rosella (Platycercus elegans)

Bracelet Honey Myrtle

Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris)

Bracelet Honey Myrtle

Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris)

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

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Great Crested Grebe

The Great Crested Grebe (Podiceps cristatus) is a medium to a large size aquatic bird; easily, and unmistakenly, recognizable with its long neck, cinnamon mane and a double black crest on its head. Juvenile birds have a striped head while an immature bird may resemble a wintering adult.
Great Crested Grebes are monogamous, and pairs stay together all year. Both birds attend the young. Females are slightly smaller than males (48-61cm). These birds are rarely seen on land.

Great Crested Grebe

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The above photos were taken a few days ago. The Grebes were in a very reedy part of the creek and getting good photographs was a challenge. The next two were taken yesterday.

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Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Another Visit – Balyang Sanctuary

This time, on my latest visit to Balyang Sanctuary, there were some new faces on the patch. It wasn’t the best time of day to be birding; most of the waterbirds here were asleep or at least resting. They were all inactive.

There was a pair of Royal Spoonbills (Platalea regia) one of which was sleeping. Until it became aware of me, that is.

 

Royal Spoonbill

Royal Spoonbill,
Platalea regia

 

Royal Spoonbill

As it preened, this Royal Spoonbill’s mate was resting

 

Royal Spoonbill

Royal Spoonbills,
Platalea regia

 

Royal Spoonbill

As I snapped away, it decided it better be more alert

On my last visit here, the Australian Pelicans were conspicuous by their absence. I don’t ever recall not seeing any Pelicans at Balyang Sanctuary. On this visit though, I am pleased to report they were back.

 

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Australian Pelican,
Pelecanus conspicillatus

 

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Australian Pelican preening

 

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Australian Pelican Reflection

This White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) made good use of the nesting box supplied by the Workers for Wetlands who do a fantastic job looking after our birds and wetlands.

 

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A Preening White-faced Heron,
Egretta novaehollandiae

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White-faced Heron

The White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) is the most common heron seen in Australia. They will be found anywhere there is water, such as mudflats, most wetlands, creeks and farm dams. They have also been known to adapt to urban areas.

 

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White-faced Heron Egretta novaehollandiae

In the above photo, this White-faced Heron was on the hunt in a dried up part of Lake Colac. Although, it was only about 5 or 6 metres from the water’s edge.

 

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White-faced Heron Egretta novaehollandiae

This Heron was seen strutting out in Barongarook Creek. This part of the creek is between two main roads and only a short distance from the city business district. Despite this, I have found this creek to be a good spot for finding waterbirds.

Adult White-faced Herons grow between 60 to 70 centimetres with 65cms being the average size. Their breeding season is from October to December and the clutch is usually 3 or 4 eggs. In a good wet season, it could be double that and the breeding season could be extended. The nest is an untidy bundle of sticks in a tree.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

Birds of Lake Colac

These are just a few of the waterbirds that call Lake Colac their home.

From my vantage point, I was able to see what appeared to be several hundred Australian Pelicans (Pelecanus conspicillatus) resting on the water’s edge. The following photos show only a fraction of their numbers.

 

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Australian Pelicans
(Pelecanus conspicillatus)

 

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Australian Pelicans
(Pelecanus conspicillatus)

An Australian White Ibis (Threskiornis molucca), flushed from the reeds in front of me, voiced its displeasure as it flew off.

Australian White Ibis

As I walked west, I accidentally stumbled upon this White-faced Heron (Egretta novaehollandiae) feeding quietly in a hollow.

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Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

Sacred Kingfisher

Back in late Spring and early Summer, as I walked around the foreshore of Lake Colac, and along the banks of Barongarook Creek, I was asked by birders: “Have you seen the Kingfisher?” Disappointedly I would answer “No”. Over the next weeks, I would keep a sharp eye open for this elusive Kingfisher but to no avail. I would hang around spots where others had seen this bird and I would leave disappointed.

Today on my walk, out of the corner of my eye, I saw a flash of bright blue fly down to the bank of the creek and then up into the tree just opposite me, on the other side of the creek. It was the Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus) which had eluded me all summer!

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

 

 

Azure Kingfisher

Sacred Kingfisher (Todiramphus sanctus)

 

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

 

 

 

 

Back to Film – Kodacolor

The results are in! After more than a decade, I have put a roll of Kodak High Definition colour film (ASA 200) in my old Nikon EM SLR which I bought back in the mid-1980s and completed a photoshoot.
The film was stored in a cupboard all that time, and I had no concerns that it would still be in good condition. The exposed film was taken to a camera shop where it was developed and printed, and I also had scans made.
I was very happy with the results, however, I felt that the scans were flat. As a result, the photos posted here have been slightly adjusted in my software.

 

Old Yarraville Post Office

The Old Yarraville Post Office

 

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Sun Theatre, Yarraville

 

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Flinders Street Station

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.