Using Expired Film

As a photographer, I know that using expired film has inherent risks. However, over the years, I have used expired film and I have never been disappointed-until now!

The film I used for this project was about 20 years old. It was Kodak Black and White 35mm print film, ISO 400. It was designed to be processed in C41 chemicals. 

A card, attached to the box containing the film, has the following printed on it:

Make Time Stand Still in Black & White

  • Extremely fine grain and outstanding sharpness make this film ideal for enlargements.
  • Processed at any photofinisher with standard color processing.

Do not process in black and white chemicals.

My first impression of the film is simply it is an extremely grainy film; certainly, there is more grain than the Kodak Tri-X 400 film I have been using recently. Or, has it become more grainy with age?

Failure (shown for an example only) -the first photo on the roll.

There were a few failures like the above photo. I am thinking that the age of the film has played a large part in these failures.

A side view of the Camperdown Post Office, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

Like many towns in regional areas of Australia, there are many heritage or historic buildings, many built in the 19th century or early 20th century. Post offices played an important role for the people of these areas, often isolated from the rest of the world.

The Old Shire Hall, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

The Hampden Shire Hall, designed by leading Melbourne architects Smith and Johnson, was built in 1886. The architects designed the building in a Lombardic Romanesque style. It was constructed by local contractors McAllister and Stansmore.

I must admit the old Hampden Shire Hall is my favourite building in Camperdown.

Old Court House, Camperdown, Victoria, Australia

The Old Court House was erected in 1886-87 by W. A. Moore, contractor. It replaced an earlier wooden structure of 1859. It was designed by architect G. B. H. Austin of the Public Works Department, who designed it in a medieval Gothic Revival style.

Please Note:
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

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Australian Native Plants

The following photographs are of some of the Australian native plants I have growing in my garden. Planted many years ago, I chose those plants to attract birds to the garden, and they have not disappointed me. 

King’s Park Special Callistemon – commonly known as a Bottlebrush
King’s Park Special Callistemon – beautifully back-lit by the late afternoon sun
Bottlebrush Mauve Mist Callistemon
Bottlebrush Mauve Mist Callistemon
Bracelet Honey Myrtle (Melaleuca armillaris)
Red Flowering Gum Tree (Eucalyptus ficifolia)
Captain Cook Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis)

Please Note: 
I am the copyright holder of all photographs that appear on this blog. These images are protected by copyright laws and all rights are reserved. To purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.