Eye Contact

Over the last few days I have been reviewing my library of images.  Here are a few bird photographs that I like – the reason? I just love the look on the face of these birds when they looked me in the eye.

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Galah

Galah

Laughing Kookaburra

Laughing Kookaburra

Australian Magpie

Australian Magpie

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.


 

Sunrise at the Erskine River

The following three photographs were taken at sunrise at one of my favourite locations – the Erskine River. Despite the rain (and my fear that a colourful sunrise would not occur) I believe these images tell the story of a winter sunrise.

 

Dawn - Erskine River

Dawn – Erskine River

For the second image I changed location. Taking up a position on the Old Swing Bridge the picture I had in my mind was a colourful sunrise with the colours reflecting on the water as the river flowed into the sea. I took several images, but as I snapped this one, I knew it would be the one I would publish. This photograph has the colours of the sunrise at its most vibrant.

The vibrant colours of sunrise - Erskine River.

The vibrant colours of sunrise – Erskine River.

The third image was taken when the sun was higher and the vibrant colours of the sunrise had been replaced by a subtle golden glow.

Erskine River - Golden Glow

Erskine River – Golden Glow

TIP: I was once given a very good piece of advice: “Remember – under exposure is your friend.” To obtain the best results in the second and third photograph I set the EV in the camera to -0.7. This little trick works very well for sunrise and sunset images by intensifying the colours.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

Laughing Kookaburra

The photograph below is of a Laughing Kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguineae) which I found basking in the warm autumn sun at Lorne on the Great Ocean Road, yesterday.

The Laughing Kookaburra is the largest Kingfisher with a massive bill, black above and horn below. The race  novaeguineae is larger than race minor which is found on Cape York Peninsular. They are 45 centimetres in body size.

Kookaburras have been known to swoop on snakes and carry them in their beak to a great height above the ground before releasing them to plunge to their death. The snake will then become the Kookaburra’s meal. I have heard stories of people who have been almost hit by the falling snake.

Laughing Kookaburra - basking in the sun.

Laughing Kookaburra – basking in the sun.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Morning

The images below were made earlier this year but were left unprocessed on the hard drive of my computer. I had a very early start at the nearby coastal town of Lorne, which is on the Great Ocean Road.

The New Pier at Lorne

The New Pier at Lorne

Ocean View, Lorne on the Great Ocean Road

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) is an Australian native bird with a body up to 50 centimetres long. Its body is white and it has a sulphur-yellow crest on the head. They breed in hollows in old growth trees. They make loud harsh noises and can be heard from a distance.

The Sulphur-crested Cockatoo’s diet is one of a herbivore, and will be found in forests, grasslands as well as urban areas.

They are considered locally abundant and are not on any endangered lists.

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Cacatua galerita, Lorne

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Cacatua galerita, Lorne

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Cacatua galerita, Lorne – Photographed along the bank of the Erskine River

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

Sulphur-crested Cockatoo, Cacatua galerita, Lorne – Erskine River

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Australian Wood Duck

The following images are of Australian Wood Ducks (Chenonetta jubata) which were taken at the Erskine River, which is located on the Great Ocean Road near Lorne in Victoria, Australia. The Wood Duck is also known as the Maned Duck.

They are described as “goose-like” ducks with a dark head and pale body. The male’s head and neck brown and has a short mane. The female has a whitish line above and below the eye. Their body size is about 44 – 50 centimetres.

A female Wood Duck which appears to have a broken wing

A female Wood Duck which appears to have a broken wing.

In the next photo the Wood Duck is clearly identified as a female: It has a lighter coloured head and neck with the two white lines above and below the eye.

Female Wood Duck

Female Wood Duck

In the next image it is easy to see the short mane on their neck.

A mated pair going for a walk.

A mated pair going for a walk.

Wood Ducks build their nests in tree hollows between July and March, and, when nesting often perch on tree branches. They are native to Australia and will be found at freshwater wetlands, grass lands and also lightly wooded areas. They are herbivores. They are not considered endangered but are locally abundant.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Erskine River

I have just returned home after spending a few days at the seaside resort town of Lorne, on the Great Ocean Road, in south west Victoria, Australia. Although we are in the middle of our winter, the days were bright sunshine, and I was able to spend several hours out and about with my camera.

Yesterday afternoon I was on the bank of the Erskine River doing some bird photography, and when I saw this scene, I knew I just had to capture it!

Erskine River

Erskine River Reflections