Banksia

The Banksia is a native Australian tree or bush. The following three images illustrate perfectly the life of the flower spike which is much sort after as a food source by nectarivorous animals, including birds, bats, rats, possums, stingless bees and a host of invertebrates. The flowers are also of an economic importance to the Australian nursery and flower industry.

These images were taken at the Geelong Botanic Gardens in autumn. The first photograph shows the flower in its perfect state.

The flower spike of a Banksia

The flower spike of a Banksia

The next image shows a flower spike after it has been visited by a nectar seeking bird or other animal.

This flower spike shows distinctive signs of being visited by nectar seeking animals.

This flower spike shows distinctive signs of being visited by nectar seeking animals.

And, finally, a flower spike which has no, or very little, nectar left to share.

A flower spike with no nectar left.

A flower spike with no nectar left.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Banksia

I came across these beautiful Banksias during a walk in the local Botanic Gardens.

Banksias are native to Australia; and were named after Sir Joseph Banks (1743-1820 ), who, in 1770, was the first European to collect specimens of these plants. Banks was a botanist aboard the Endeavour with Captain James Cook during his voyage of discovery up the east coast of Australia in 1770.

There are 173 species of Banksia.

Banksia

Banksia

Banksia

Banksia #2

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

Macro

I must admit, I love macro-photography; and that usually means flowers. So the last few days I’ve been out about with my camera and, as it is spring here in Australia beautiful blooms are appearing everywhere.

Tulip, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Tulip

Banksia, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Banksia – A popular Australian Native. This particular one is a hybrid known as Candle Stick.

Banksia, Barongarook West, Victoria, Australia

Candlestick Banksia

Banksia – Naturally Australian

A popular native Australian plant found in many home gardens is the Banksia.

Of the 173 species all but one occur naturally in Australia. It was named after Sir Joseph Banks (1743 – 1820) a noted botanist who sailed with Captain James Cook up the east coast of Australia in 1770. He is believed to be the first European to have taken specimens of this plant.

Banksia

Banksia ericifolia – a common species found in many gardens

Banksia, Candlestick

Banksia – Candlestick is a popular hybrid species, also found in many Australian gardens

Banksia, Candlestick

Banksia, Candlestick