Wattlebirds

Wattlebirds are Australian native honeyeaters. They are characterised by their wattles which are are bare fleshy appendages, usually wrinkled and often brightly coloured, hanging from the cheeks, neck or throat, and presumably serving for display.

The Little Wattlebird (Anthochaera chrysoptera), which lacks wattles, and the smallest of the species has a body size of 26 – 33 centimetres. The female is smaller.

Little Wattlebird at the birdbath.

Little Wattlebird at the birdbath – note the lack of wattles.

Wattlebirds will aggressively defend their territory and have been known to force other species out.

This juvenile Little Wattlebird was captured shaking the water off after its bath.

This juvenile Little Wattlebird was captured shaking the water off after its bath.

In the above image, the rufous wing patch, normally conspicuous in flight, can be readily seen.

The Red Wattlebird (Anthochaera carunculata) is the only other Wattlebird endemic to this area. This particular one, pictured below, arrived at my bird bath, had a drink, then promptly flew off. I don’t normally see them in my garden, but they are very common where I walk at Lake Colac and Barongarook Creek.

Red Wattlebird, (Anthochaera carunculata) - note the red wattles.

Red Wattlebird, (Anthochaera carunculata) – note the red wattles.

The Red Wattlebird has a body of size of about 31 – 39 centimetres. Again, the female is smaller.

Another shot of the Red Wattlebird.

Another shot of the Red Wattlebird.

Please Note: All photographs appearing on my blog were taken by me. They are copyrighted and all rights are reserved. If you would like to purchase a print please contact me by leaving a comment below with your order and contact details. I will then get back to you.

 

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